itur

English translation: So it goes

23:16 Jul 25, 2008
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Anthropology / language
Latin term or phrase: itur
sic itur
gin
English translation:So it goes
Explanation:
I suspect this is a native English speaker's way of rendering "and so it goes" into Latin. Itur is an "impersonal" 3rd person (present indicative) form--passive ending on an intransitive verb (i.e. normally has no passive forms).

I suspect it's very rare in Roman prose, if it occurs at all. There's a famous use in Aeneid 6 179-- Itur in antiquam silvam, stabula alta ferarum. There it means in context "they go".

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Note added at 20 hrs (2008-07-26 20:14:12 GMT)
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As for Roman prose, Perseus gives two exx. in the Cicero Verrine orations, two in Livy, and two in Tacitus' Annales. Contexts are interesting--check them out.
Selected response from:

Stephen C. Farrand
United States
Local time: 17:38
Grading comment
thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2goes, leaves, departs
Luciano Eduardo de Oliveira
4 +2So it goes
Stephen C. Farrand


  

Answers


29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
goes, leaves, departs


Explanation:
Itur is the third person singular of the verb ire (to go) in the passive. You can translate it as he/she/it goes, but it's closer in meaning to Spanish se va or Portuguese vai-se, if you know what I'm saying.

Luciano Eduardo de Oliveira
Brazil
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Anders Dalström: sic itur ad astra: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sic itur ad astra
11 hrs

agree  Joseph Brazauskas
13 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
sic itur
So it goes


Explanation:
I suspect this is a native English speaker's way of rendering "and so it goes" into Latin. Itur is an "impersonal" 3rd person (present indicative) form--passive ending on an intransitive verb (i.e. normally has no passive forms).

I suspect it's very rare in Roman prose, if it occurs at all. There's a famous use in Aeneid 6 179-- Itur in antiquam silvam, stabula alta ferarum. There it means in context "they go".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 hrs (2008-07-26 20:14:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As for Roman prose, Perseus gives two exx. in the Cicero Verrine orations, two in Livy, and two in Tacitus' Annales. Contexts are interesting--check them out.

Stephen C. Farrand
United States
Local time: 17:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joseph Brazauskas
11 hrs
  -> Gratias maximas, Ioseph!

agree  grazy73
18 hrs
  -> Gratias maximas, Grazy!
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