R. D. or q R.D.

English translation: Reverendus Dominus (?)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:R. D.
English translation:Reverendus Dominus (?)
Entered by: Chris Rowson (X)

06:32 Jan 9, 2003
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary / an old marriage certificate (Roman Catholic )
Latin term or phrase: R. D. or q R.D.
this is a handwritten document and hard to read (all weathered and semi-legible). Not sure if the q is just a fold in the paper. The R.D is an abbreviation for something priestly. It is followed by a name and surname of the priest.
Lota
United States
Local time: 09:33
Reverendus Dominus
Explanation:
Very much in the realms of the wild guess, but the reference (Polish roots, yet!) gives "Reverendus" as being appropriate for abbot, bishop, suffragan (wielebny).

But are not bishops and abbots referred to in English as "My Lord" (and I am fairly sure an Abbott is a Dominus)? Was the signatory perhaps a Reverendus Dominus?
Selected response from:

Chris Rowson (X)
Local time: 18:33
Grading comment
Thank you, I think it is the best answer. Thank you, all!
Lota
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2Rural Dean
Rowan Morrell
3Reverend Doctor
LQA Russian
1 +1Reverendus Dominus
Chris Rowson (X)


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Rural Dean


Explanation:
It may not be Latin at all.

The Catholic Encyclopedia has a rather impressive list of ecclesiastical abbreviations, and among them is "R.D.", which is given as "Rural Dean".

Would that fit your translations? I have provided a link to the CE's page of ecclesiastical abbreviations. They haven't got anything about "q R.D.", but anyway, I hope this has helped.

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Note added at 2003-01-09 06:44:17 (GMT)
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Sorry, I meant \"Would that fit your context\"?

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Note added at 2003-01-09 07:50:47 (GMT)
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Are you sure it\'s \"R.D.\" and not \"R.P.\"?

R.P. stands for \"Reverendus Pater\", or Reverend Father. Maybe that\'s it!


    Reference: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01022a.htm
Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 04:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  karmenu attard
16 mins
  -> Thanks Karmenu.

agree  bartek: Agree to R.P. Reverendus Pater
1 hr
  -> Thanks Bartek. R.P. seems more likely.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Reverend Doctor


Explanation:
it could be Reverend Doctor

LQA Russian
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Reverendus Dominus


Explanation:
Very much in the realms of the wild guess, but the reference (Polish roots, yet!) gives "Reverendus" as being appropriate for abbot, bishop, suffragan (wielebny).

But are not bishops and abbots referred to in English as "My Lord" (and I am fairly sure an Abbott is a Dominus)? Was the signatory perhaps a Reverendus Dominus?


    Reference: http://www.polishroots.com/translating.htm
Chris Rowson (X)
Local time: 18:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 49
Grading comment
Thank you, I think it is the best answer. Thank you, all!
Lota

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rowan Morrell: This seems as good a guess as any.
4 hrs
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