Troia ceciderat. Ulixes, fessus, cum sociis Graecis ad Ithacam navem solverat.

English translation: Troy had fallen. Ulysses, tired, had set sail for Ithaca together with his Greek fellows

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:Troia ceciderat. Ulixes, fessus, cum sociis Graecis ad Ithacam navem solverat.
English translation:Troy had fallen. Ulysses, tired, had set sail for Ithaca together with his Greek fellows
Entered by: Giusi Pasi

01:15 Jan 12, 2004
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Latin term or phrase: Troia ceciderat. Ulixes, fessus, cum sociis Graecis ad Ithacam navem solverat.
Latin story.
Susan Hedjazi
Troja had fallen. Ulysses, tired, had set sail to Ithaca together with his fellows
Explanation:
-

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Note added at 2004-01-12 09:51:35 (GMT)
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ooops, I forgot \"GREEK fellows (or companions)\"
Selected response from:

Giusi Pasi
Italy
Local time: 09:43
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +10Troja had fallen. Ulysses, tired, had set sail to Ithaca together with his fellows
Giusi Pasi


  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +10
Troja had fallen. Ulysses, tired, had set sail to Ithaca together with his fellows


Explanation:
-

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-01-12 09:51:35 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ooops, I forgot \"GREEK fellows (or companions)\"

Giusi Pasi
Italy
Local time: 09:43
Native speaker of: Italian
PRO pts in pair: 55
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter: GP (and one other) never fail to impress me with their comprehensive command of Latin.
27 mins
  -> :-)))

agree  Cristina Moldovan do Amaral
1 hr

agree  Chris Rowson (X): "set sail for Ithaca" is more idiomatic, I think. And then maybe "... with his Greek companions"?
5 hrs

agree  Flavio Ferri-Benedetti: Mitica (non Itaca!) Giusi - Vivat Lingua Latina!
7 hrs

agree  Adam Bartley: Yep, should be with his "Greek" companions (to include Graecis). More old fashioned, but closer to the latin is "and launched his ship for Ithaca".
7 hrs

agree  Joseph Brazauskas: Rem habes.
1 day 1 hr

agree  Mark Cole: Troy
1 day 8 hrs
  -> yesss, TROY!

agree  Estella
1 day 11 hrs

agree  JessicaC
1 day 11 hrs

agree  Luca Bassini
2 days 1 hr
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