ipse dixit!

English translation: an unsupported assertion

05:30 Apr 8, 2004
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Government / Politics
Latin term or phrase: ipse dixit!
ipse dixit! the chater overrules the parliament.
chubba
English translation:an unsupported assertion
Explanation:
The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.

ipse dixit

SYLLABICATION: ip·se dix·it

NOUN: An unsupported assertion, usually by a person of standing; a dictum.
ETYMOLOGY: From Latin ipse dixit, he himself said (it) : ipse, he himself + dixit, third person sing. perfect tense of dcere, to say.


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Note added at 8 mins (2004-04-08 05:39:13 GMT)
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Literally: \"he himself said\" (it), or \"He himself has spoken\", or more literary: \"Just because he/I say this is true\"
Selected response from:

Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 16:41
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +6an unsupported assertion
Kirill Semenov
3viz
danya


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
an unsupported assertion


Explanation:
The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.

ipse dixit

SYLLABICATION: ip·se dix·it

NOUN: An unsupported assertion, usually by a person of standing; a dictum.
ETYMOLOGY: From Latin ipse dixit, he himself said (it) : ipse, he himself + dixit, third person sing. perfect tense of dcere, to say.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2004-04-08 05:39:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Literally: \"he himself said\" (it), or \"He himself has spoken\", or more literary: \"Just because he/I say this is true\"


    Reference: http://www.bartleby.com/61/61/I0226100.html
Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 16:41
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Valentini Mellas: :)
10 mins
  -> thank you :)

agree  Cristina Moldovan do Amaral
17 mins
  -> thank you :)

agree  Giusi Pasi
54 mins
  -> thank you :)

agree  Eva Blanar
1 hr
  -> thank you :)

agree  giogi: yes, typical before the first Scientific Revolution (XVI cent.) to keep safe Aristotle's principles, unfortunately misreading them!
1 hr
  -> very true, the rediscovery of Greek philosophy through Arabic translations led the Westerners to rely on Aristotle's views with an indiscriminate enthusiasm :)

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
2 hrs
  -> thank you :)
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
viz


Explanation:
i agree with Kirill as regards the translation
but i would argue that it means an unsupported assertion
i think it rather means that someone asserts smth referring the listener to some authoruty for confirmation of one's words;
this used to be a principle in religious discussions, when in argument it was enough to say that the teacher/prophet/whoever of authority himself had said this or that; Greek "autos épha"


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Note added at 2 hrs 12 mins (2004-04-08 07:43:20 GMT)
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to Giovanna: does not unsupported mean groundless? which is not quite the case with this principle, i think. when you say ipse dixit, it is not an allegation, you indicate that you trust \"him\" that much that his words constitute the ultimate confirmation of veracity

danya
Local time: 16:41
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  giogi: You're right, but where's the difference? Unsupported assertion means "not justified" not developed, not sustained by evidences..
4 mins
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