passus duriusculus

English translation: a series (which is) a little bit louder

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:passus duriusculus
English translation:a series (which is) a little bit louder
Entered by: Joseph Brazauskas

07:39 Nov 30, 2006
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Music
Latin term or phrase: passus duriusculus
My interest in this phrase is in the usage in musical contexts in the 17th to 21st centuries, in various languages. I don´t have a Latin sentence in which it occurs.

Google references mostly indicate that it refers to a falling chromatic passage, or sometimes to a falling or rising chromatic passage. Perhaps I should be content to accept the modern usage as found, but I would appreciate it if someone could illuminate for me the meaning of the Latin from which it derives.
Chris Rowson (X)
Local time: 09:50
a series (which is) a little bit louder
Explanation:
Not being a musician, I venture upon this answer gingerly. But literally it means 'a step which is a bit harder', 'durius' being the comparative of 'durus' and '-culus' a diminutive suffix.
Selected response from:

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Grading comment
Thank you all. It turned out that the musical use of this term is essentially in a single 17th C treatise, which is less than lucid, together with a few late 20th C trawlers after obscurity. The meaning remains unclear.

But what I wanted was to know what the Latin might mean, in order to help me to understand what the musicians might be intending. You all helped, but it was Joseph who brought me closest to what I think is the best glossary entry.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3a series (which is) a little bit louder
Joseph Brazauskas
2a moderately more difficult passage
Rebecca Garber
1 +1Chromatic series?
David Moore


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Chromatic series?


Explanation:
I didn't want to post this as an answer as it is not in English, and hence my "confidence(?)" but it wouldn't fit up there...
Have a look at the following site, to see if it helps:

Passus duriusculus - Wikipedia- [ Translate this page ]
Ein Passus duriusculus (lat. "der harte/schwere Gang") ist eine Kette von chromatisch abwärts absteigenden Sekunden. Die chromatische Tonleiter wird dabei ...
de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passus_duriusculus


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Note added at 1 hr (2006-11-30 08:43:42 GMT)
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And it looks rather as if it goes up or down...

[DOC] Lecture 7: Harmony III: Obscuring HarmonyFile Format: Microsoft Word - View as HTML
... Bars 5 to 6 build a harmonic cliché, a passus duriusculus, the chromatic descent in the bass from i to V. This can be partly explained as an intervallic ...
www.sussex.ac.uk/music/documents/session


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Note added at 4 hrs (2006-11-30 12:30:28 GMT)
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Could this refer to a transition passage from one key i.e. major or minor to the other - or to a diiferent key? Only because the German "major" or sharp is generally "dur"...

David Moore
Local time: 09:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joseph Brazauskas: 'Passus' would imply a transition.
6 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
a series (which is) a little bit louder


Explanation:
Not being a musician, I venture upon this answer gingerly. But literally it means 'a step which is a bit harder', 'durius' being the comparative of 'durus' and '-culus' a diminutive suffix.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you all. It turned out that the musical use of this term is essentially in a single 17th C treatise, which is less than lucid, together with a few late 20th C trawlers after obscurity. The meaning remains unclear.

But what I wanted was to know what the Latin might mean, in order to help me to understand what the musicians might be intending. You all helped, but it was Joseph who brought me closest to what I think is the best glossary entry.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
a moderately more difficult passage


Explanation:
The literal meaning of the Latin. I can't comment on musical application, though, as one would expect an ascending or decending chromatic passage to be rather easier. Thus the confidence level.


Rebecca Garber
Local time: 03:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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