avis, volucres, passeri

English translation: bird

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:avis, volucer, passer
English translation:bird
Entered by: Joseph Brazauskas

12:57 Nov 3, 2004
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Latin term or phrase: avis, volucres, passeri
I have seen the three terms AVIS, VOLUCRES, PASSERI translated as BIRDS. WHich one is correct? Are they all correct, but meaning different kinds of bird?
Could you please explain your answer and givre examples, if possible,
Many thanks
Arcoiris
Local time: 03:41
bird(s)
Explanation:
'Avis' (singular) is the generic term for 'bird'. It refers to any species.

'Volucres' (plural; the singular is 'volucer') is properly an adjective meaning 'flying'. It is used substantively to mean 'birds' (of any species), but it is almost entirely confined to poetry.

'Passeres' (not 'passeri'; it is plural, the singular being 'passer') refers to any small bird, especially to a sparrow.

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Note added at 3 days 3 hrs 48 mins (2004-11-06 16:45:49 GMT)
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The only form \'passeri\' which occurs in Latn, classical or otherwise, is the dative singular.

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Note added at 3 days 10 hrs 9 mins (2004-11-06 23:06:51 GMT)
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By form--I did not use the term in a biological sense--I meant grammatical form. As I\'ve already stated, thgough apparently not clearly enough, the only grammatical form \'passeri\' which exists in Latin, classical or otherwise, is the dative singular.

Selected response from:

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Grading comment
Thank you all. This is the explanation I was looking for
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2bird(s)
Joseph Brazauskas
3 +3avis is the most common word
Kirill Semenov
3viz
danya
3birds
Simon Molnar


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
viz


Explanation:
Aves - the class of vertebrates comprising the birds. [pl. of Latin avis bird]

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Note added at 7 mins (2004-11-03 13:05:04 GMT)
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passerine (`pæs

danya
Local time: 06:41
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 12
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
avis is the most common word


Explanation:
Say, like in "rara avis" (a rare bird)

Volucres (from singulra "volucris", bird) means rather "a flying animal" (volucer volucris volucre, flying, winged; fleet, swift, fleeting. F. as subst. volucris -is, a bird or flying insect). You may compare it to "feathery" in English.

`Passeri' is rather "sparrows" (comes from singular passere, passeris). In wider sense, it's a small bird.

Passere, -eris, m. a sparrow or other small bird; a sea fish, a plaice or flounder.

Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 05:41
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 36

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  danya: ave magister))
4 mins
  -> íå ñîòâîðè ñåáå êóìèðà! ;-)))

agree  laura rutigliano
29 mins

agree  sonja29 (X)
2 days 26 mins

neutral  Joseph Brazauskas: The plural is 'passeres'. It is of the 3rd, not of the 2nd, declension.
3 days 3 hrs
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26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
birds


Explanation:
avis=birds as a class of vertebrates. All birds are included in this class.
passeri=within the above class the order of birds that have feet specialised for perching, are also called perching birds or songbirds (passeriformes if I recall correctly from Latin)
volucres=I do not know but may stem from volo (I fly) and be another general expersion for birds as such? I think this is not in the terminology of ornithology or biological classification.




    Reference: http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/passerine
Simon Molnar
Local time: 04:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in HungarianHungarian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Joseph Brazauskas: Again, the form 'passeri' does not exist.
3 days 3 hrs
  -> Again, the word 'passeri' does exist and is a suborder of passeriformes.
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3 days 3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
bird(s)


Explanation:
'Avis' (singular) is the generic term for 'bird'. It refers to any species.

'Volucres' (plural; the singular is 'volucer') is properly an adjective meaning 'flying'. It is used substantively to mean 'birds' (of any species), but it is almost entirely confined to poetry.

'Passeres' (not 'passeri'; it is plural, the singular being 'passer') refers to any small bird, especially to a sparrow.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 days 3 hrs 48 mins (2004-11-06 16:45:49 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The only form \'passeri\' which occurs in Latn, classical or otherwise, is the dative singular.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 days 10 hrs 9 mins (2004-11-06 23:06:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By form--I did not use the term in a biological sense--I meant grammatical form. As I\'ve already stated, thgough apparently not clearly enough, the only grammatical form \'passeri\' which exists in Latin, classical or otherwise, is the dative singular.



Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 56
Grading comment
Thank you all. This is the explanation I was looking for

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Electra
1 day 5 mins
  -> Maximas tibi gratias ago.

agree  Egmont
2 days 15 hrs
  -> Thank you.
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