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novus ordro seclerum

English translation: see below

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09:36 Aug 26, 2000
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Latin term or phrase: novus ordro seclerum
text on 1 us
dollar
K C
English translation:see below
Explanation:
Literally, it means "New Order of the Ages".
Here's some more info:
"Below it is the Latin inscription Novus Ordo Seculorum, which translates as "New World Order." Or does it? What we have here is a compound error made up of bad Latin, bad spelling, and poor history. Those readers who, like myself, took some Latin in high school, might remember that the suffix "orum" is the genitive plural for nouns in the second declension. Seculorum would have to be plural and mean "of the worlds," which seems a rather clumsy phrasing. It certainly would be if in fact the word in question was "seculorum." Actually, in their desire to read an apocalyptic conspiracy into our currency, the millenarian crowd has added the letter "u" between the "c" and the "l" of the word printed on the dollar, which is seclorum or "of the ages." Thus, far from saying "New World Order," Novus Ordo Seclorum reads "New Order of the Ages." Since this symbol and motto are on the back of our country's Great Seal and were put there when the nation was being founded, they represent the revolutionary sentiment that by dispensing with kings, whose rule was autocratic and based on force, and replacing that system with a republic based on reason, balance of powers, and self rule, the founders of our nation were creating a new order for the ages."

Selected response from:

Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 15:17
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +2see below
Laura Gentili


  

Answers


11 mins peer agreement (net): +2
see below


Explanation:
Literally, it means "New Order of the Ages".
Here's some more info:
"Below it is the Latin inscription Novus Ordo Seculorum, which translates as "New World Order." Or does it? What we have here is a compound error made up of bad Latin, bad spelling, and poor history. Those readers who, like myself, took some Latin in high school, might remember that the suffix "orum" is the genitive plural for nouns in the second declension. Seculorum would have to be plural and mean "of the worlds," which seems a rather clumsy phrasing. It certainly would be if in fact the word in question was "seculorum." Actually, in their desire to read an apocalyptic conspiracy into our currency, the millenarian crowd has added the letter "u" between the "c" and the "l" of the word printed on the dollar, which is seclorum or "of the ages." Thus, far from saying "New World Order," Novus Ordo Seclorum reads "New Order of the Ages." Since this symbol and motto are on the back of our country's Great Seal and were put there when the nation was being founded, they represent the revolutionary sentiment that by dispensing with kings, whose rule was autocratic and based on force, and replacing that system with a republic based on reason, balance of powers, and self rule, the founders of our nation were creating a new order for the ages."



Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 15:17
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 95
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kirill Semenov
1484 days

agree  Mariusz Rytel
1801 days
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