KudoZ home » Latin to English » Art/Literary

Naturam expellas furca, tamen usque recurret

English translation: You can drive nature out with a pitchfork, but she always comes back

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:Naturam expellas furca, tamen usque recurret
English translation:You can drive nature out with a pitchfork, but she always comes back
Entered by: Sheila Hardie
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

07:53 Nov 11, 2001
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Latin term or phrase: Naturam expellas furca, tamen usque recurret
Sé que la expresion equivalente en español es "genio y figura hasta la sepultura" pero me gustaria tener la traduccion literal.

Muchas gracias
Yannick MARCHEGAY
France
Local time: 10:00
You can drive nature out with a pitchfork...
Explanation:
I'm not sure if you want it in English or Spanish, but here's an attempt at the English!

HTH


Sheila


naturam expellas furca, tamen usque recurret You can drive nature out with a pitchfork but she always comes back. Literally, "Nature can be expelled with a fork, but nevertheless always returns"

http://www.rktekt.com/ck/LatSayings.html
Selected response from:

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 10:00
Grading comment
Thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +1“What’s bred in the bone will come out in the flesh.”
Simon Charass
4No matter how ferociously you drive Nature away, she’ll still keep coming backgrosbach
4You can drive nature out with a pitchfork...
Sheila Hardie


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
You can drive nature out with a pitchfork...


Explanation:
I'm not sure if you want it in English or Spanish, but here's an attempt at the English!

HTH


Sheila


naturam expellas furca, tamen usque recurret You can drive nature out with a pitchfork but she always comes back. Literally, "Nature can be expelled with a fork, but nevertheless always returns"

http://www.rktekt.com/ck/LatSayings.html

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 10:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 20
Grading comment
Thank you
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
“What’s bred in the bone will come out in the flesh.”


Explanation:
Bred in the bone. A part of one’s nature. “What’s bred in the bone will come out in the flesh.” A natural propensity cannot be repressed. Naturam furcâ expellas, autem usque redibit.

E. Cobham Brewer 1810–1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.


    Reference: http://www.bartelby.com
Simon Charass
Canada
Local time: 04:00
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Beppe Chironi (Kix)
1 day 8 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4099 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
No matter how ferociously you drive Nature away, she’ll still keep coming back


Explanation:
Nātūram expellās furcā, tamen usque recurret

Even if you drive Nature away with a pitchfork, she’ll still keep coming back

No matter how ferociously you drive Nature away, she’ll still keep coming back

The translations already provided seem more than adequate. Even so, here are alternatives intended to express the sense, more than the literal meaning, of the saying. Here are some justifications:
expellās can have the sense of it is possible for you to drive away (but not you have the power or skill to drive away), but it can also have the sense of if you drive away, which seems more appealing here, especially in the presence of furcā and tamen
furcā (with or using (a) pitchfork) suggests the great determination, intensity, ferocity, or even viciousness with which one might drive Nature away; in contemporary English, we might express this meaning with an expression such as at gunpoint
tamen has a meaning like nevertheless, still, even so; it suggests that, here, furcā means even with a pitchfork
usque adds a meaning like continuously, without stopping
recurret is future tense: (she) will return or come back
I urge those who find fault with any of this to post explanations of my errors here. I’ll be very grateful.


grosbach
Local time: 04:00
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search