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hubris

English translation: excess of ambitious arrogance

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:hubris
English translation:excess of ambitious arrogance
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02:40 Jan 25, 2002
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Latin term or phrase: hubris
It is through "hubris" that disaster comes.
haas
Excess of ambitious arrogance
Explanation:
It's from 19th Century Greek: hubris or hybris.
It means an excess of ambitious arrogance, ultimately causing the transgressor's ruin.
(See Collins dictionary).

In Classical Greek drama, that was the fate of kings, heroes and others who defied the gods (who alone had the power to decide destiny), attempting to decide for themselves how successful or all-conquering they would be (again, only the gods could be omnipotent and omniscient).

In modern times, the Kennedy family were often likened to Greek heroes: their hubris in attempting to use their wealth, charm, brains, beauty etc to become all-powerful, (supposedly) led to the tragic sequence of death and destruction that befell them.
Selected response from:

John Kinory
Local time: 10:31
Grading comment
I asked this question as it appears in the Introduction of The Epic of Gilgamesh which I'm reading for my Honors History course. In Honors English,we're reading the Iliad; this theme is reoccuring there as well. Thank-you so much for bringing better understanding to both my epics:)!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5Excess of ambitious arroganceJohn Kinory
4A note...
flaviofbg
4pride; excess of pride
Parrot


  

Answers


26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
pride; excess of pride


Explanation:
The concept is Greek and is inherent in drama. "Pride comes before a downfall".

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 11:31
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4
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33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Excess of ambitious arrogance


Explanation:
It's from 19th Century Greek: hubris or hybris.
It means an excess of ambitious arrogance, ultimately causing the transgressor's ruin.
(See Collins dictionary).

In Classical Greek drama, that was the fate of kings, heroes and others who defied the gods (who alone had the power to decide destiny), attempting to decide for themselves how successful or all-conquering they would be (again, only the gods could be omnipotent and omniscient).

In modern times, the Kennedy family were often likened to Greek heroes: their hubris in attempting to use their wealth, charm, brains, beauty etc to become all-powerful, (supposedly) led to the tragic sequence of death and destruction that befell them.

John Kinory
Local time: 10:31
PRO pts in pair: 7
Grading comment
I asked this question as it appears in the Introduction of The Epic of Gilgamesh which I'm reading for my Honors History course. In Honors English,we're reading the Iliad; this theme is reoccuring there as well. Thank-you so much for bringing better understanding to both my epics:)!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
A note...


Explanation:
Please remember that you should transcribe this as "hybris", since Greek "u" is an "y" both in transcription and modern pronunciation (sort a German ü)

Best wishes, Flavio

flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 11:31
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 155
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