KudoZ home » Latin to English » Art/Literary

sit

English translation: And let a blessing be.

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:sit
English translation:And let a blessing be.
Entered by: Egmont
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

10:19 Sep 27, 2000
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Latin term or phrase: sit
Word from an old religious song (tantum ergo). Context: salus, honor, virtus quoque. Sit et benedictio. And: Procedenti ab utroque. Compar sit laudatio.
Louise
And let a blessing be.
Explanation:
Here's more info:

Pange Lingua
Sing, My Tongue

By St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274). Today it is used on Holy Thursday,
Corpus Christi and the last two stanzas (Tantum Ergo) are often used at
Benediction. The rhythm of the Pange Lingua is said to have come down from
a marching song of Caesar's Legions: "Ecce, Caesar nunc triumphat qui subgegit Gallias."


Pange lingua gloriosi
Sing, my tongue,

Corporis mysterium,
The mystery of the glorious body,

Sanguinisque pretiosi,
And of the precious Blood,

Quem in mundi pretium
Shed to save the world,

Rex effudit Gentium
Fructus ventris generosi
By the King of the nations
The Fruit of a noble womb.

Nobis datus, nobis natus
Given to us, born for us,

Ex inacta Virgine,
From a stainless Virgin,

Et in mundo conversatus,
And having dwelt in the world,

Sparso verbi semine,
Sowing the seed of the word,

Sui moras incolatus
Miro clausit ordine.
He closed in a wonderful way,
The days of his habitation.

In suprema nocte coenae
On the night of His last supper,

Recumbus cum fratribus Reclining with His brothers,

Observata lege plene
The law having been fully observed

Cibis in legalibus,
With legal foods,

Cibum turbae duodenae
Se dat suis manibus.
He gives Himself as food with His
Own hands to the twelve.

Verbum caro, panem verum
The Word in Flesh makes true Bread

Verbo carnem efficit:
His Flesh with a word;

Fitque sanguis Christi merum,
Wine becomes the Blood of Christ,

Et si sensus deficit,
And if sense is deficient,

Ad firmandum cor sincerum
To confirm sincere hearts,

Sola fides sufficit.
Faith alone suffices.

Tantum ergo Sacramentum
Veneremur cernui:
Then let us prostrate and
Venerate so great a Sacrament,

Et antiquum documentum
And let the old law yield

Novo cedat ritui:
To the new rite;

Praestet fides supplementum
Sensuum defectui.
Let faith stand forward to
Supply the defect of the senses.

Genitori, Genitoque
To the Begetter and the Begotten,

Laus et jubilatio,
Be praise and jubilation,

Salus, honor, virtus quoque
Health, honor, and strength,

Sit et benedictio:
And blessing too,

Procedenti ab utroque
Compar sit laudatio.
And let equal praise be to Him,
Who proceeds from Both.

Amen. Alleluia.
Selected response from:

Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 02:07
Grading comment
Thank you very much for your extensive answer! It's been a great help.
Louise
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
na +1And let a blessing be.
Laura Gentili
nabeRandi Stenstrop


  

Answers


1 hr peer agreement (net): +1
And let a blessing be.


Explanation:
Here's more info:

Pange Lingua
Sing, My Tongue

By St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274). Today it is used on Holy Thursday,
Corpus Christi and the last two stanzas (Tantum Ergo) are often used at
Benediction. The rhythm of the Pange Lingua is said to have come down from
a marching song of Caesar's Legions: "Ecce, Caesar nunc triumphat qui subgegit Gallias."


Pange lingua gloriosi
Sing, my tongue,

Corporis mysterium,
The mystery of the glorious body,

Sanguinisque pretiosi,
And of the precious Blood,

Quem in mundi pretium
Shed to save the world,

Rex effudit Gentium
Fructus ventris generosi
By the King of the nations
The Fruit of a noble womb.

Nobis datus, nobis natus
Given to us, born for us,

Ex inacta Virgine,
From a stainless Virgin,

Et in mundo conversatus,
And having dwelt in the world,

Sparso verbi semine,
Sowing the seed of the word,

Sui moras incolatus
Miro clausit ordine.
He closed in a wonderful way,
The days of his habitation.

In suprema nocte coenae
On the night of His last supper,

Recumbus cum fratribus Reclining with His brothers,

Observata lege plene
The law having been fully observed

Cibis in legalibus,
With legal foods,

Cibum turbae duodenae
Se dat suis manibus.
He gives Himself as food with His
Own hands to the twelve.

Verbum caro, panem verum
The Word in Flesh makes true Bread

Verbo carnem efficit:
His Flesh with a word;

Fitque sanguis Christi merum,
Wine becomes the Blood of Christ,

Et si sensus deficit,
And if sense is deficient,

Ad firmandum cor sincerum
To confirm sincere hearts,

Sola fides sufficit.
Faith alone suffices.

Tantum ergo Sacramentum
Veneremur cernui:
Then let us prostrate and
Venerate so great a Sacrament,

Et antiquum documentum
And let the old law yield

Novo cedat ritui:
To the new rite;

Praestet fides supplementum
Sensuum defectui.
Let faith stand forward to
Supply the defect of the senses.

Genitori, Genitoque
To the Begetter and the Begotten,

Laus et jubilatio,
Be praise and jubilation,

Salus, honor, virtus quoque
Health, honor, and strength,

Sit et benedictio:
And blessing too,

Procedenti ab utroque
Compar sit laudatio.
And let equal praise be to Him,
Who proceeds from Both.

Amen. Alleluia.

Laura Gentili
Italy
Local time: 02:07
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 95
Grading comment
Thank you very much for your extensive answer! It's been a great help.
Louise

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Egmont
724 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr
be


Explanation:
sit = est in the optative mode

I found this about the hymn (there is much more on the Web):

Among the gifts St. Thomas Aquinas left the Church are the beautiful hymns, including the Pange Lingua ("Sing, My Tongue"), from his Office of the Feast of Corpus Christi. The final two verses of Pange Lingua are known as the Tantum Ergo ("Down in Adoration Falling"), and are used during the Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament:

Genitori, Genitoque
Laus et iubilatio,
Salus, honor, virtus quoque
Sit et benedictio:
Procedenti ab utroque
Compar sit laudatio.

To the everlasting Father,
And the Son Who reigns on high
With the Holy Spirit proceeding
Forth from each eternally,
Be salvation, honor blessing,
Might and endless majesty.

Rather a free translation; here is a more literal one:

To the Begetter and the Begotten
Be praise and jubilation,
Health, honor, and strength,
And blessing too,
And let equal praise be to Him,
Who proceeds from Both.








    Reference: http://www.smart.net/~tak/Prayers/corpus_christi.html
    Reference: http://www.alternatives.com/library/rel/relccath/thomasaq.tx...
Randi Stenstrop
Local time: 02:07
Native speaker of: Danish
PRO pts in pair: 24
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search