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Dicebat ille miser: "Civis Romanus sum."

English translation: That poor wretch kept saying, "I am a Roman citizen!"

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18:52 Dec 3, 2000
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Latin term or phrase: Dicebat ille miser: "Civis Romanus sum."
I translated it into "This man was telling the miser: I am a Roman citizen." I know that ille comes from ille, illa, illud which means this/these; dicebat is the imperfect form of dicere, which means to speak/say, tell; miser translates into miser; Romanus translates into Roman and Civis translates into citizen
Walter Lane
English translation:That poor wretch kept saying, "I am a Roman citizen!"
Explanation:
TRANSLATION: That poor wretch kept saying, "I am a Roman citizen!"

You must guard against thinking that a Latin word spelled like an English word must mean the same thing. NOT AT ALL! This whole text is from Cicero, who attacks Verres, the Roman governor in Sicily (if I remember rightly), for abusing his power. This line is what one of Verres' victims said while being tortured by the Mr. Nasty.

DICEBAT: "was saying, kept saying."

ILLE MISER: "that wretch, that wretched person." This expression is in the nominative case (and singular), so it *absolutely* must be the subject of the (singular) verb DICEBAT. It cannot be the indirect object, as you've rendered it.

CIVIS ROMANUS: "(a) Roman citizen."

SUM: "I am."
Selected response from:

Wigtil
Grading comment
Thanks a lot for giving me the right answer. I had figured it out once I got to class the following day, and it turns out that your answer is right
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
naThat poor wretch kept saying, "I am a Roman citizen!"
Wigtil


  

Answers


1 day 12 hrs
That poor wretch kept saying, "I am a Roman citizen!"


Explanation:
TRANSLATION: That poor wretch kept saying, "I am a Roman citizen!"

You must guard against thinking that a Latin word spelled like an English word must mean the same thing. NOT AT ALL! This whole text is from Cicero, who attacks Verres, the Roman governor in Sicily (if I remember rightly), for abusing his power. This line is what one of Verres' victims said while being tortured by the Mr. Nasty.

DICEBAT: "was saying, kept saying."

ILLE MISER: "that wretch, that wretched person." This expression is in the nominative case (and singular), so it *absolutely* must be the subject of the (singular) verb DICEBAT. It cannot be the indirect object, as you've rendered it.

CIVIS ROMANUS: "(a) Roman citizen."

SUM: "I am."


Wigtil
PRO pts in pair: 67
Grading comment
Thanks a lot for giving me the right answer. I had figured it out once I got to class the following day, and it turns out that your answer is right

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
Laura Gentili
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