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radere

English translation: to shave

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:radere
English translation:to shave
Entered by: Joseph Brazauskas
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01:36 Jan 16, 2003
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Latin term or phrase: radere
said by Jehova in the Bible
rick
to shave
Explanation:
Literally this verb (a present infinitive active) means 'to scrape', but more commonly 'to shave'.

However, that 'radere'here means 'to shave', I'm mostly extrapolating from its Romance reflexes (Italian 'radere', French 'raser', etc.), and also from the ass-umption that you're quoting from the Vulgate, the Latin of which is very close in many ways to that of the (so-called 'Vulgar') spoken Latin whence these tongues evolved. If so, 'to shave' is probably the most likely sense.

But as Chris notes, a context is needed.
Selected response from:

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Grading comment
thks for the answer!
the word I was looking from was actually "raeré" from a spanish version of the bible, and I figured the latin origin of that word could be "radere"
congrats for a good job.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1to shave
Joseph Brazauskas
4to shave, to raze, to rase
João Carlos Pijnappel


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
to shave


Explanation:
Literally this verb (a present infinitive active) means 'to scrape', but more commonly 'to shave'.

However, that 'radere'here means 'to shave', I'm mostly extrapolating from its Romance reflexes (Italian 'radere', French 'raser', etc.), and also from the ass-umption that you're quoting from the Vulgate, the Latin of which is very close in many ways to that of the (so-called 'Vulgar') spoken Latin whence these tongues evolved. If so, 'to shave' is probably the most likely sense.

But as Chris notes, a context is needed.


Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 432
Grading comment
thks for the answer!
the word I was looking from was actually "raeré" from a spanish version of the bible, and I figured the latin origin of that word could be "radere"
congrats for a good job.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Chris Rowson: It could be 2nd person passive, even an imperative. "You should get a shave"?
5 hrs
  -> That's true.

agree  xxxcmk
44 days
  -> Thanks.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
to shave, to raze, to rase


Explanation:
these would be the most common alternatives, I suppose

João Carlos Pijnappel
Local time: 04:20
Native speaker of: Portuguese
PRO pts in pair: 4
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