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carpe diem quam minimum credula postero

English translation: Seize the day, trusting little in tomorrow

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:carpe diem quam minimum credula postero
English translation:Seize the day, trusting little in tomorrow
Entered by: Chris Rowson
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05:57 Jan 29, 2003
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Latin term or phrase: carpe diem quam minimum credula postero
on a knife
Seize the day, trusting little in tomorrow
Explanation:
Gather ye rosebuds while ye may ...

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Note added at 2003-01-29 06:13:41 (GMT)
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Horace, Odes Book I, No. XI

The most famous of Horace\'s odes uses agricultural metaphors to urge us to embrace the pleasures available in everyday life instead of relying on remote aspirations for the future - hence his immortal motto \"Carpe Diem\", or \"pluck the day\":

Tu ne quaesieris - scire nefas - quem mihi, quem tibi
finem di dederint, Leuconoë, nec Babylonios
temptaris numeros. ut melius, quicquid erit, pati!
seu plures hiemes, seu tribuit Iuppiter ultimam,
quae nunc oppositis debilitat pumicibus mare
Tyrhenum. Sapias, vina liques, et spatio brevi
spem longam reseces. dum loquimur, fugerit invida
aetas: carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.

Ask not - we cannot know - what end the gods have set for you, for me; nor attempt the Babylonian reckonings Leuconoë. How much better to endure whatever comes, whether Jupiter grants us additional winters or whether this is our last, which now wears out the Tuscan Sea upon the barrier of the cliffs! Be wise, strain the wine; and since life is brief, prune back far-reaching hopes! Even while we speak, envious time has passed: pluck the day, putting as little trust as possible in tomorrow!

Or,

Do not ask - we may not know - what end you or I
have been granted by the gods, Leuconoe, and do not try
Babylonian astrology. Better accept whatever will be!
Be it many winters Jupiter has granted, or one last winter
now making the Tyrrhenian sea spend its strength on pitted rocks,
be wise, strain your wine, and life being short,
prune back your hopes for the long term. While we speak, envious time
has flown: harvest the day, distrust the morrow!
Selected response from:

Chris Rowson
Local time: 04:03
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +10Seize the day, trusting little in tomorrowChris Rowson
2Seize the day with a minimum of trust in the next.
Jonathan Spector


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
Seize the day with a minimum of trust in the next.


Explanation:
I'm not quite certain that all the declensions are right, but the meaning seems logical. I'd be glad to hear from peers with a better translation.

Jonathan Spector
Israel
Local time: 05:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 8
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +10
Seize the day, trusting little in tomorrow


Explanation:
Gather ye rosebuds while ye may ...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-29 06:13:41 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Horace, Odes Book I, No. XI

The most famous of Horace\'s odes uses agricultural metaphors to urge us to embrace the pleasures available in everyday life instead of relying on remote aspirations for the future - hence his immortal motto \"Carpe Diem\", or \"pluck the day\":

Tu ne quaesieris - scire nefas - quem mihi, quem tibi
finem di dederint, Leuconoë, nec Babylonios
temptaris numeros. ut melius, quicquid erit, pati!
seu plures hiemes, seu tribuit Iuppiter ultimam,
quae nunc oppositis debilitat pumicibus mare
Tyrhenum. Sapias, vina liques, et spatio brevi
spem longam reseces. dum loquimur, fugerit invida
aetas: carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.

Ask not - we cannot know - what end the gods have set for you, for me; nor attempt the Babylonian reckonings Leuconoë. How much better to endure whatever comes, whether Jupiter grants us additional winters or whether this is our last, which now wears out the Tuscan Sea upon the barrier of the cliffs! Be wise, strain the wine; and since life is brief, prune back far-reaching hopes! Even while we speak, envious time has passed: pluck the day, putting as little trust as possible in tomorrow!

Or,

Do not ask - we may not know - what end you or I
have been granted by the gods, Leuconoe, and do not try
Babylonian astrology. Better accept whatever will be!
Be it many winters Jupiter has granted, or one last winter
now making the Tyrrhenian sea spend its strength on pitted rocks,
be wise, strain your wine, and life being short,
prune back your hopes for the long term. While we speak, envious time
has flown: harvest the day, distrust the morrow!


    Reference: http://www.millennia-designs.com/trolleyed/76/85/
Chris Rowson
Local time: 04:03
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 49
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Eva Blanar
8 mins

agree  Daniela Falessi
1 hr

agree  flaviofbg: Perfect
2 hrs

agree  Marie Scarano
2 hrs

agree  Joseph Brazauskas
8 hrs

agree  xxxIno66: wow
9 hrs

agree  Sheila Hardie
13 hrs

agree  Estella
12 days

agree  Egmont
31 days

agree  xxxcmk
31 days
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