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Drago Dormiens Nunquam Titilladus

English translation: Never tease the dragon that sleeps

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13:13 Dec 3, 2003
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Latin term or phrase: Drago Dormiens Nunquam Titilladus
Drago Dormiens Nunquam Titilladus
PAM
English translation:Never tease the dragon that sleeps
Explanation:
I think "titilladus" is wrong...
Selected response from:

irat56
France
Local time: 13:22
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2Never tickle a sleeping dragonChris Rowson
3 +3Never tease the dragon that sleeps
irat56


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Never tease the dragon that sleeps


Explanation:
I think "titilladus" is wrong...

irat56
France
Local time: 13:22
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 31
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Arcoiris: Never tease the sleeping dragon. The original comes from Harry Potter. It's the motto of Hogwarts school for wizards and witches. Draco dormiens nunquam titilandus
9 mins
  -> Thanks! Titillandus is the word!

agree  Fanta: sleeping dragon sounds nice !
49 mins
  -> Yes, but it was Chris's!

agree  Kirill Semenov
1 day 4 hrs
  -> Merci! Spassiba!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Never tickle a sleeping dragon


Explanation:
Like "let sleeping dogs lie".

Professor Brazauskas will perhaps point out that this structure should not be translated as an active, but this is what is meant.

Where does this misspelling of "titillandus" without the "n" come from? - it is often asked here with this mistake.

Chris Rowson
Local time: 13:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 49

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  giogi
4 hrs

agree  verbis
4 days
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