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pro rata

English translation: proportionally

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:pro rata
English translation:proportionally
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03:37 Sep 14, 2001
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
Latin term or phrase: pro rata
6 weeks holiday may be taken in each year and pro rata for parts of a year.
Glyn Davies
in proportion
Explanation:
According to the OED:

in proportion to the value or extent (of his interest), proportionally. Also attrib. or as adj., proportional.

Basically means you get holiday in proportion to the part of the year worked. You work six months, you get three weeks holiday.

Very commonly used in English, though ... would be understood in most cases.

HTH

Mary
Selected response from:

Mary Worby
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:13
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1prorated for part of the year
CLS Lexi-tech
4 +1proportionally
Francesco D'Alessandro
4 +1in proportion
Mary Worby
4pro rataAlbert Golub


  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
pro rata


Explanation:
from the latin pro rata temporis

Albert Golub
Local time: 15:13
Native speaker of: French
PRO pts in pair: 12
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
in proportion


Explanation:
According to the OED:

in proportion to the value or extent (of his interest), proportionally. Also attrib. or as adj., proportional.

Basically means you get holiday in proportion to the part of the year worked. You work six months, you get three weeks holiday.

Very commonly used in English, though ... would be understood in most cases.

HTH

Mary


    OED
Mary Worby
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:13
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DrSantos
2 hrs
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
proportionally


Explanation:
it means that if you are entitled to 6 weeks in a year, you'll get 3 week for 6 months, 4 weeks for 8 months, etc.

Francesco D'Alessandro
Spain
Local time: 14:13
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 11

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DrSantos: Exactly
2 hrs
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
prorated for part of the year


Explanation:
is the closest English word, with a Latin etymology.

that is if you have worked for less than a year, then the amount of holidays you get will be proportional, prorated, to the period of employment.


Who is this outfit offering 6 weeks holidays in a year? Wow

paola l m


CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 09:13
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  DrSantos: Right again.What is the problem with these people?
2 hrs
  -> what people, Omar? ciao
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