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In Diligo

English translation: this is not latin

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:In Diligo
English translation:this is not latin
Entered by: literary
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19:06 Nov 28, 2008
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Latin term or phrase: In Diligo
As meaning "In Love". Correct?
literary
Local time: 17:37
this is not latin
Explanation:
Dear literary,

I think this is not a Latin expression. The explanation you cited are, well, not good :-), I guess these sentences were coined by someone, who knows a very little Latin.
Amicitia saepius ENDS (this is English) in diligo, sed (tamen is not right here) diligo in amicitia nunquam. This would be the correct sentence, but it's still bleeding from wounds, especially this "in diligo"...

In bellum nos lucror, in diligo regimus: This is utterly not Latin. The sentence would be: In bello vincimus, in diligo (there is no such word!) regimus.

in love: in amore. But this depends on the meaning (I think no one ever has written this expression down in Latin), You can't just translate something into Latin, because it differs from English a lot.

P

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 óra (2008-11-29 12:32:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

So, you say, several people use this expression: "in diligo" on the net. Are they all mistaken?
My short answer: yes.

Grammatical explanation, because I feel you don't believe me:

Diligo is a verb, it means "I love (honor, etc)". This word means this and nothing else. The word is transitive, so it cannot be used without a noun. Not to mention "instead of" a noun.

The praeposition "in" needs a noun in accusative or ablative. Diligo cannot be accusative, so it has to be ablative. In this case, the nominative has to be diligus or diligum. But there is no such word.

Click on the link, you'll see all the Latin words which begin with "dilig".

If you want someone to translate an expression for you, why don't you ask for it?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 óra (2008-11-29 12:58:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

No, diligo is not infinitive.

The link:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/resolveform?lookup=dili...

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Note added at 19 óra (2008-11-29 14:33:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Dear literary,

I have been dealing with latin texts since 1998. I have an MA degree in Latin, and my PhD-thesis is about the Latin language of law in Hungary. Please, do believe me. Please. :-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 óra (2008-11-29 17:54:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Dear literary,

about so many people making the same mistake: There are rock bands with Latin names, but they don't mean anything. There are scandinavian rock bands, that translate their texts into English by taking the first meaning of a word in their dictionary. It's like drawing lines on a paper, and then telling: this is Chinese.

About those expression on the tattoos: they are hardly Latin (the most of them). And the big thing about them: they are hard to erase :-)
Selected response from:

Péter Jutai
Hungary
Local time: 17:37
Grading comment
OK, Péter, your explanations helped a lot! Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2this is not latinPéter Jutai
4 +2if you are looking for legitimate/correct Latin quotes...
Veronika McLaren


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
if you are looking for legitimate/correct Latin quotes...


Explanation:
...instead of muddled up ones with English mixed in ("quid doesn't inguolo me makes mihi validus"!), try http:// www.yuni.com/library/latin_5.html.
I completely agree with Peter's grammmatical explanations.

Veronika McLaren
Local time: 11:37
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Péter Jutai
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Peter!

agree  Joseph Brazauskas
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Joseph!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
this is not latin


Explanation:
Dear literary,

I think this is not a Latin expression. The explanation you cited are, well, not good :-), I guess these sentences were coined by someone, who knows a very little Latin.
Amicitia saepius ENDS (this is English) in diligo, sed (tamen is not right here) diligo in amicitia nunquam. This would be the correct sentence, but it's still bleeding from wounds, especially this "in diligo"...

In bellum nos lucror, in diligo regimus: This is utterly not Latin. The sentence would be: In bello vincimus, in diligo (there is no such word!) regimus.

in love: in amore. But this depends on the meaning (I think no one ever has written this expression down in Latin), You can't just translate something into Latin, because it differs from English a lot.

P

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 óra (2008-11-29 12:32:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

So, you say, several people use this expression: "in diligo" on the net. Are they all mistaken?
My short answer: yes.

Grammatical explanation, because I feel you don't believe me:

Diligo is a verb, it means "I love (honor, etc)". This word means this and nothing else. The word is transitive, so it cannot be used without a noun. Not to mention "instead of" a noun.

The praeposition "in" needs a noun in accusative or ablative. Diligo cannot be accusative, so it has to be ablative. In this case, the nominative has to be diligus or diligum. But there is no such word.

Click on the link, you'll see all the Latin words which begin with "dilig".

If you want someone to translate an expression for you, why don't you ask for it?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 óra (2008-11-29 12:58:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

No, diligo is not infinitive.

The link:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/resolveform?lookup=dili...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 óra (2008-11-29 14:33:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Dear literary,

I have been dealing with latin texts since 1998. I have an MA degree in Latin, and my PhD-thesis is about the Latin language of law in Hungary. Please, do believe me. Please. :-)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 óra (2008-11-29 17:54:59 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Dear literary,

about so many people making the same mistake: There are rock bands with Latin names, but they don't mean anything. There are scandinavian rock bands, that translate their texts into English by taking the first meaning of a word in their dictionary. It's like drawing lines on a paper, and then telling: this is Chinese.

About those expression on the tattoos: they are hardly Latin (the most of them). And the big thing about them: they are hard to erase :-)

Péter Jutai
Hungary
Local time: 17:37
Native speaker of: Hungarian
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
OK, Péter, your explanations helped a lot! Thanks!
Notes to answerer
Asker: What link? "diligo" is the infinitive form, isn't it?

Asker: diligo to single out, value, esteem, prize, love Entry in Lewis & Short or Elem. Lewis dîligô pres ind act 1st sg I can't decipher the code, but the English translations ARE in the infinitive.

Asker: I appreciate your qualifications, but this is a forum for straight-to-the-point answers, not answers which are riddles. So "diligo" is just "I love", and the infinitive form doesn't exist?

Asker: Freelang Dictionary Latin-English: diligo - to choose out, esteem highly, prize, love, to value highly So many people making the same mistake?

Asker: diligere, 3rd conjugation, says a Polish specialist. After "in" there should be ablativus, but there is no noun which has such an ablativus - "diligo". OK? The Pole says like all of you (he has a link to this question) that it's just imitation of Latin, ungrammatical.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joseph Brazauskas: It looks like machine translation to me.
4 hrs
  -> thx

agree  Veronika McLaren
5 hrs
  -> köszönöm :)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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