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pro tantra

English translation: [See below]

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22:24 Sep 4, 2000
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
Latin term or phrase: pro tantra
it was in the middle of a contract
bob
English translation:[See below]
Explanation:
The phrase is misspelled. It should be PRO TANTA. It must be associated with some feminine singular noun (even if the noun is implicit, i.e., not expressed). The preposition PRO requires/takes ablative-case nouns or pronouns, and only a fem. abl. singular would be spelled TANTA.

It implies "in exchange for so much (something)" or "in return for so much (something)".

PRO has several possible meanings, but in a contract one would expect this rather common sense, "in exchange/return for", the same one used in Latenglish phrases like QUID PRO QUO ("one thing in return for another") or even PRO BONO ("in exchange for the good (and nothing more)", not in exchange for payment).

TANTUS/TANTA/TANTUM means "so much" (singular) or "so many" (plural).

Modern Latin, such as its French or Spanish forms, continues in much the same way. POUR (Fr.) or POR (Sp.) is used for financial exchanges, marking either the monetary amount or the object purchased (pour cent dollars, por cien do'lares...payer cinquante francs pour le livre, pagar cincuenta pesos por el libro). And of course both TANT (AUTANT, etc.) and TANTO/TANTA continue to mean "so much, so many".
Selected response from:

Wigtil
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Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +2[See below]Wigtil
nato the same extentRandi Stenstrop
naPro tanto: For so much; to the extent, but only to the extentJesús Paredes


  

Answers


8 hrs peer agreement (net): +2
[See below]


Explanation:
The phrase is misspelled. It should be PRO TANTA. It must be associated with some feminine singular noun (even if the noun is implicit, i.e., not expressed). The preposition PRO requires/takes ablative-case nouns or pronouns, and only a fem. abl. singular would be spelled TANTA.

It implies "in exchange for so much (something)" or "in return for so much (something)".

PRO has several possible meanings, but in a contract one would expect this rather common sense, "in exchange/return for", the same one used in Latenglish phrases like QUID PRO QUO ("one thing in return for another") or even PRO BONO ("in exchange for the good (and nothing more)", not in exchange for payment).

TANTUS/TANTA/TANTUM means "so much" (singular) or "so many" (plural).

Modern Latin, such as its French or Spanish forms, continues in much the same way. POUR (Fr.) or POR (Sp.) is used for financial exchanges, marking either the monetary amount or the object purchased (pour cent dollars, por cien do'lares...payer cinquante francs pour le livre, pagar cincuenta pesos por el libro). And of course both TANT (AUTANT, etc.) and TANTO/TANTA continue to mean "so much, so many".


Wigtil
PRO pts in pair: 67
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kirill Semenov
1474 days

agree  Mariusz Rytel
1791 days
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2 days15 hrs
Pro tanto: For so much; to the extent, but only to the extent


Explanation:
I found "Pro Tanto" which is used in contracts. Dictionary of Legal Terms, Barron's.

Jesús Paredes
Local time: 02:09
PRO pts in pair: 8
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11 days
to the same extent


Explanation:
I think this might be helpful even if it's not from a contract but from insurance/law:

"When the insured already has been paid by a settling co-insurer, the principle of indemnity can be served by reducing the insured’s recovery at trial by an amount equal to the settlement paid by the settling insurer. Then, the insured’s total recovery from both insurers does not exceed one hundred percent of its damages. This is generally termed a pro tanto setoff."

And

Moreover, under different tort liability schemes, a settlement with one tortfeasor affects a judgment against non-settling defendants in different ways. ... The two broad alternatives are (1) pro-tanto ("to the same extent") reduction, under which a settlement reduces the judgment against remaining defendants dollar for dollar; and (2) proportionate share reduction, under which a settlement reduces the judgment in proportion to the settling tortfeasor's fault. ... It is also possible to reduce a judgment in proportion to the number of settling tortfeasors, rather than by their fault; such a scheme is often called "pro rata" reduction, though it is more informatively termed "per capita".


    Reference: http://www.ca5.uscourts.gov/opinions/pub/98/98-60016-CV0.HTM
Randi Stenstrop
Local time: 08:09
Native speaker of: Native in DanishDanish
PRO pts in pair: 24
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