prono. aff.

English translation: pronomen affixum

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:prono. aff.
English translation:pronomen affixum
Entered by: curiousworld
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04:59 Oct 21, 2013
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics / exegesis, pro textu refingendo and emendando
Latin term or phrase: prono. aff.
[Arabic phrase (nam sic ibi legendum loco 'Arabic characters']. Rarius ipsum nominativum prono. aff. auctum constituit, ut apud Manacc.

What does this abbreviation stand for? Textual commentary in Latin (18th century) on an Arabic manuscript. Arabic words/characters are inserted, I don't know Arabic.
curiousworld
Kyrgyzstan
Local time: 15:05
pronomen affixum
Explanation:
likely

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Note added at 6 hrs (2013-10-21 11:51:58 GMT)
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...or in this sentence pronomine affixo of course

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Note added at 1 day30 mins (2013-10-22 05:30:11 GMT)
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This nominative is (perfect for present) less commonly (=more rarely) extended by a pronoun affix, as used by Manacc.

(The Semitic languages can affix a pronoun ending to a noun to indicate possession, for example. I figure that's what this refers to.)
Selected response from:

Jim Tucker
United States
Grading comment
Thank you very much to all for showing interest in my question and effective help.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4pronomen affixum
Jim Tucker
3pronomini affinem
Joseph Brazauskas


  

Answers


9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
pronomini affinem


Explanation:
That is, 'like (similar to) a pronoun', if 'aff.' stands for 'affinis', as it commonly does, 'affinem' being accusative to agree with 'nominativum' and 'pron.' presumably dative because of 'affinis'.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you for your very interesting proposition. But I am in doubt, not knowing Arabic. For me word connectivity is better construed if these two words are in the same case Accus. 'nomintavum' being an adjective, governed by 'constituit'. I think I will give two variants with affixum and affinem, let an arabist make his own choice.

Asker: With your help, I understand it like this: The commentor has decided to use the more rare nominative, extended ...

Asker: Sorry, I misplaced instead of Jim Tucker.

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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
pronomen affixum


Explanation:
likely

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2013-10-21 11:51:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

...or in this sentence pronomine affixo of course

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day30 mins (2013-10-22 05:30:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

This nominative is (perfect for present) less commonly (=more rarely) extended by a pronoun affix, as used by Manacc.

(The Semitic languages can affix a pronoun ending to a noun to indicate possession, for example. I figure that's what this refers to.)

Jim Tucker
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you very much to all for showing interest in my question and effective help.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you!

Asker: Yes, really, it makes sense. This way of agreement did not occur to me. So, literally: the nominative made longer by the affixed pronoun? Could you translate in full?

Asker: Yes, rarius can be only an adverb here.

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