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Cras amet qui numquam amavit quique amavit cras amet

English translation: Tomorrow s/he will love, who never loved before, and who has loved will love tomorrow as well!

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:Cras amet qui numquam amavit quique amavit cras amet
English translation:Tomorrow s/he will love, who never loved before, and who has loved will love tomorrow as well!
Entered by: Egmont
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18:54 Aug 14, 2002
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Latin term or phrase: Cras amet qui numquam amavit quique amavit cras amet
I have a friend that has been wanting to tell me something, but says hes too shy. When I finally got it out of him, he sent it to me in latin!
brittney
Tomorrow s/he will love, who never loved before, and who has loved will love tomorrow as well!
Explanation:
I hope it helps, brittney :)

Cras: tomorrow
amet: s/he will love
qui: who
numquam: never
amavit: has loved
quique: and s/he who

Flavio
Selected response from:

flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 00:25
Grading comment
Thank you very much. I had a very hard time looking for that! Now I can surprise my friend and tell him I know wut he means! Thanks alot.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2Tomorrow s/he will love, who never loved before, and who has loved will love tomorrow as well!
flaviofbg
5 +1Let him love who has never loved, and let him love who has loved.
David Wigtil


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Tomorrow s/he will love, who never loved before, and who has loved will love tomorrow as well!


Explanation:
I hope it helps, brittney :)

Cras: tomorrow
amet: s/he will love
qui: who
numquam: never
amavit: has loved
quique: and s/he who

Flavio

flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 00:25
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 155
Grading comment
Thank you very much. I had a very hard time looking for that! Now I can surprise my friend and tell him I know wut he means! Thanks alot.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxSprachprof: correct translation
5 mins
  -> Thank you

neutral  David Wigtil: The pronoun must be "he" (not "she"), as guaranteed by word QUI, a masculine form which appears twice. Roman poets worried little about politically correct attitudes toward women!
7 mins
  -> You are right, but in any case we have to think about the current context - the meaning has become "neutral" nowadays and it may have been addressed to a woman - should we translate just with the masculine and give to the asker an ambiguous doubt?

neutral  Chris Rowson: Like Loquamur, I would translate what is there, not modernise it. Otherwise "Carthago delenda est" becomes "We should seek to initiate a dialogue with the Iraqi government." (Bush isn´t PC either :-)
8 hrs
  -> Oh, Chris, I don't think I have changed it *that* much. Plus, the receiver of the phrase clearly *is* a woman. We don't want her to think she's the wrong sex, do we?

agree  xxxcmk
199 days
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Let him love who has never loved, and let him love who has loved.


Explanation:
This is actually a quotation, a repeated echo in an anomymous ancient poem (2nd or 3rd century A.D.) called the Pervigilium Veneris (The Night-Watch of Venus). See http://community.middlebury.edu/~harris/Classics/Pervigilium... for further detail.

GRAMMAR:
The subjunctive form AMET is a type of urging or wish or command, rather than a true future (which would be AMABIT).

The word QUI assures that a man is envisioned in both instances.

VOCABULARY:
The verb AMO, AMARE, thoroughly confused the notion of "love" and that of "having sex" in ancient Latin texts, to the point that Latin versions of the Greek New Testament typically use a different verb, DILIGO, DILIGERE, to translate the Greek verb for "love" (agapw). In our prudish era most people are truly shocked at the sexuality of "classical" Roman literature. CAVEAT LECTOR (let the reader beware). CAVEAT INTERPRES (let the translator beware).

--Loquamur, Ph. D. in ancient Greek, college professor of Latin, Greek, German, French, and Spanish



    Reference: http://community.middlebury.edu/~harris/Classics/Pervigilium...
David Wigtil
United States
Local time: 18:25
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 19

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  flaviofbg: Interesting, thank you
14 hrs
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