KudoZ home » Latin to English » Other

The latin word maximum comes from the latin adjective?

English translation: From the "mag-" root, not from "magnus" itself.

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
16:45 May 14, 2001
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Latin term or phrase: The latin word maximum comes from the latin adjective?
1) malus
2) multus
3) magnus
4) bonus
me
English translation:From the "mag-" root, not from "magnus" itself.
Explanation:
The MAG- root in Latin produces several words, which means that these words are all "cousins", so in such instances it is incorrect to say that MAXIMUS comes from MAGNUS, or similar expressions.

There are several examples of such "cousin" words:
-> MAGNUS (MAG- plus an -N- affix plus the adjective ending)
-> MAGIS (MAG- plus a general-purpose ending, for adverbial function)
-> MAIOR/MAIUS (MAG- plus the -IOR/-IUS endings, creating the comparative-degree adjective -- the new combination -GI- in the hypothetical MAGIOR/MAGIUS was altered to the simpler -I-)
-> MAXIMUS (MAG- plus the superlative suffix -SIM- found in many places [laetisSIMus, tristisSIMus, etc.] plus the adjective ending -- the -GS- combination in the hypothetical MAGSIMUS was altered to the familiar MAXIMUS).
-> MAGISTER (MAG- plus a complex ending, creating the noun meaning "great person, head person, teacher, master, top dog" -- there is a word of similar formation build on the MIN- root, namely MINISTER, "servant")

On the other hand, many words were actually built on MAGNUS proper. For example, we have MAGNITUDO ("size, largeness"), MAGNANIMUS ("high-minded"), and many others.

This MAG- root is very old and must have existed in the language that later evolved into the ancient languages that were actually written down. Ancient Greek has a MEG- root, the source of many recently-invented English words ("megawatt", "megalomania", etc.). Ancient Sanskrit has a MAH- root, and the English words "maharajah" ("great king") and "mahatma" ("great soul"), derived from the languages of India, continue to show this root.

Selected response from:

Wigtil
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
naFrom the "mag-" root, not from "magnus" itself.Wigtil
namagnusCarolina R


  

Answers


3 hrs
magnus


Explanation:
"maximus" is the superlative of "magnus", that means "big".
If you have doubts, send me an email.

At your service,
Carolina


    Vox Dictionary
Carolina R
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

15 hrs
From the "mag-" root, not from "magnus" itself.


Explanation:
The MAG- root in Latin produces several words, which means that these words are all "cousins", so in such instances it is incorrect to say that MAXIMUS comes from MAGNUS, or similar expressions.

There are several examples of such "cousin" words:
-> MAGNUS (MAG- plus an -N- affix plus the adjective ending)
-> MAGIS (MAG- plus a general-purpose ending, for adverbial function)
-> MAIOR/MAIUS (MAG- plus the -IOR/-IUS endings, creating the comparative-degree adjective -- the new combination -GI- in the hypothetical MAGIOR/MAGIUS was altered to the simpler -I-)
-> MAXIMUS (MAG- plus the superlative suffix -SIM- found in many places [laetisSIMus, tristisSIMus, etc.] plus the adjective ending -- the -GS- combination in the hypothetical MAGSIMUS was altered to the familiar MAXIMUS).
-> MAGISTER (MAG- plus a complex ending, creating the noun meaning "great person, head person, teacher, master, top dog" -- there is a word of similar formation build on the MIN- root, namely MINISTER, "servant")

On the other hand, many words were actually built on MAGNUS proper. For example, we have MAGNITUDO ("size, largeness"), MAGNANIMUS ("high-minded"), and many others.

This MAG- root is very old and must have existed in the language that later evolved into the ancient languages that were actually written down. Ancient Greek has a MEG- root, the source of many recently-invented English words ("megawatt", "megalomania", etc.). Ancient Sanskrit has a MAH- root, and the English words "maharajah" ("great king") and "mahatma" ("great soul"), derived from the languages of India, continue to show this root.




    Ph. D. in ancient Greek, college instructor of Latin, Greek, and other languages.
Wigtil
PRO pts in pair: 67
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search