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Non me novisti, tuum parasitum?

English translation: Haven't you recognized me, your parasite?

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:Non me novisti, tuum parasitum?
English translation:Haven't you recognized me, your parasite?
Entered by: Branka Arrivé
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14:26 May 29, 2001
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Latin term or phrase: Non me novisti, tuum parasitum?
Non me novisti, tuum parasitum? Non negem, si noverim.
Sean Thom
Don't you recognize me, your parasite?
Explanation:
Don't you recognize (or haven't you recognized) me, your parasite?
If I recognized you, I wouldn't deny you.

For "parasite" see e.g. The Language of Plautus's Parasites by
Robert Maltby, University of Leeds
(ref. 1)
Here is the beginning:
The parasite, or flatterer, has a long tradition in Graeco-Roman comedy, going back ultimately to Epicharmus. All parasites, both Greek and Roman, share in varying degrees certain comic characteristics - impudence, wit and, especially in the Roman variety, a keen interest in food.
Selected response from:

Branka Arrivé
Local time: 03:21
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +2Don't you recognize me, your parasite?Branka Arrivé


  

Answers


17 hrs peer agreement (net): +2
Don't you recognize me, your parasite?


Explanation:
Don't you recognize (or haven't you recognized) me, your parasite?
If I recognized you, I wouldn't deny you.

For "parasite" see e.g. The Language of Plautus's Parasites by
Robert Maltby, University of Leeds
(ref. 1)
Here is the beginning:
The parasite, or flatterer, has a long tradition in Graeco-Roman comedy, going back ultimately to Epicharmus. All parasites, both Greek and Roman, share in varying degrees certain comic characteristics - impudence, wit and, especially in the Roman variety, a keen interest in food.



    Reference: http://www.open.ac.uk/Arts/CC99/Maltby.htm
Branka Arrivé
Local time: 03:21
PRO pts in pair: 12
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Johanna Timm, PhD
38 days

agree  Egmont
534 days
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