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Carpe Diem

English translation: seize the day!

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06:19 Jun 12, 2001
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Latin term or phrase: Carpe Diem
name of one of my favorite songs
jon
English translation:seize the day!
Explanation:

Ciao.

Giovanni
Selected response from:

Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:49
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naSeize the Day!
Roomy Naqvy
nablimey!
Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL
naHarvest the day, OR TRADITIONALLY, Seize the day.Wigtil
naseize the day!
Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL


  

Answers


33 mins
seize the day!


Explanation:

Ciao.

Giovanni

Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:49
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
giogi: I agree
15 hrs

Roomy Naqvy: true
1 day 4 hrs
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1 hr
Harvest the day, OR TRADITIONALLY, Seize the day.


Explanation:
Nothing is as simple as it seems:

Problem 1.
The Latin verb CARPE virtually never means "seize" -- normally it means "harvest" or "pluck". But because the popular opinion of non-Latinist Anglophones is that CARPE DIEM actually means "seize the day", that's what we're stuck with in our culture.

Problem 2.
The phrase itself comes from an eight-line poem by Quintus Horatius Flaccus ("Horace"), which seems to commend the fret-free life. But on closer examination (in scholarly classical journals, not on the Web), it is most likely an invitation to a young lady to quit consulting fortune-tellers about how to find the right man, and to to come and spend the night with the poet, instead. In this view, CARPE DIEM is a code for, "Take me! I'm here in real life (daylight). Forget your dark queries about when you'll die."

Here's the text:

Tu ne quaesieris, scire nefas, quem mihi, quem tibi
finem di dederint, Leuconoe, nec Babylonios
temptaris numeros. ut melius, quidquid erit, pati,
seu pluris hiemes seu tribuit Iuppiter ultimam,
quae nunc oppositis debilitat pumicibus mare
Tyrrhenum: sapias, vina liques, et spatio brevi
spem longam reseces. dum loquimur, fugerit invida
aetas: carpe diem quam minimum credula postero.




    Ph. D. in ancient Greek, college instructor of Latin, Greek, and other languages.
Wigtil
PRO pts in pair: 67
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2 hrs
blimey!


Explanation:
Well, I studied Latin and Ancient Greek as well! I'm sure Jon only wanted to have an idea...

Giovanni

Giovanni Guarnieri MITI, MIL
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:49
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
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1 day 5 hrs
Seize the Day!


Explanation:
Essentially, it should mean 'seize the day' or 'seize the moment' or 'make the most out of the moment'.

One interesting instance is the Nobel Laureate Saul Bellow's 1956 novel, Seize the Day, which was singled out for citation when he was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature.

Best wishes
Roomy F Naqvy

Roomy Naqvy
India
Local time: 10:19
Native speaker of: Native in HindiHindi
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