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short phrase

English translation: Everybody is the maker of his own fortunes

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21:27 Aug 15, 2001
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Latin term or phrase: short phrase
FABER EST SUAE QUISQUE FORTUNAE APPIUS CLAUDIUS CAECUS DICTUM ARCANUM EST ROMA
Antonio
English translation:Everybody is the maker of his own fortunes
Explanation:
Appius Claudius Caecus

Though "smith" is the literal translation of "faber" as occupation, the term means "maker"

Found this on the net, about dictum arcanum

From: "DOUGLAS KOLLER"

> > >"Faber est suae quisque fortunae addius Claudius caecus dictum arcanum
> est
> > >neutron."

> > But that neutron eludes me.

> Since it was a cryptogram and the students botched "Appius", perhaps
> "neutron" is also a mistaken decoding (stumping such an esteemed panel
would
> seem to indicate that something is amiss).

For those who were losing sleep...

The math teacher explained that each cipher contains a "clue" word to the
next cipher. According to him (undoubtedly via the book he was using),
Caesar Augustus came up with this really keen cipher system where you just
shift the alphabet over one letter:

ABCDEFG... becomes
BCDEFGH... (no one would be able to crack that one)

The Augustinian code was the one used for this cryptoquote and it happens to
be in Latin (get it?). Therefore, the math teacher suggests the translation
is:

"Every man is the fashioner of his own fortune -- Appius Claudius Caecus
(the code word [i.e. of the next cipher] is 'neutron' [the next cipher may
well be in English])."

Don't know if "dictum arcanum" is an adequate translation of "code word"
(wouldn't "shibboleth" or a variation thereon have been available at that
time?), (and, keep in mind, the writers of the cipher puzzles may not be the
avid Latinophiles that *we* are) but the math teacher seemed content, so who
am I to argue?

conlang@egroups.com/msg00457.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://www.mail-archive.com/conlang@egroups.com/msg00457.htm...

dictum arcanum, literally is "mysterious statement", also "secret"
Roma, means in Rome

Appius Claudius was a famous consul who built the Appian way in Rome and the acqueduct

regards

paola l m
civis romanus sum
Selected response from:

CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 03:00
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Summary of answers provided
na +1Each man is the smith of his own fortune; Each one is the architect of his own fate
Sven Petersson
naEverybody is the maker of his own fortunes
CLS Lexi-tech


  

Answers


2 hrs peer agreement (net): +1
Each man is the smith of his own fortune; Each one is the architect of his own fate


Explanation:
http://user.icx.net/~ptillman/tjcl/events/tjclcon.htm
Theme: "Faber est suae quisque fortunae" "Each one is the architect of his own fate" Appius, Epistle I, De Republica Ordinale

http://www.jonban.dircon.co.uk/BusinessHouse/
FABER EST SUAE QUISQUE FORTUNAE
"Each man is the smith of his own fortune"
Ad Caesarem Senem de Publica Oratio
http://www.geocities.com/SouthBeach/3797/quotes.html
"Faber est suae quisque fortunae." [Each man is the smith of his own fortune.]
- Appius Claudius Caecus

Sven Petersson
Sweden
Local time: 09:00
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 18

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  slavist
3 hrs
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5 hrs
Everybody is the maker of his own fortunes


Explanation:
Appius Claudius Caecus

Though "smith" is the literal translation of "faber" as occupation, the term means "maker"

Found this on the net, about dictum arcanum

From: "DOUGLAS KOLLER"

> > >"Faber est suae quisque fortunae addius Claudius caecus dictum arcanum
> est
> > >neutron."

> > But that neutron eludes me.

> Since it was a cryptogram and the students botched "Appius", perhaps
> "neutron" is also a mistaken decoding (stumping such an esteemed panel
would
> seem to indicate that something is amiss).

For those who were losing sleep...

The math teacher explained that each cipher contains a "clue" word to the
next cipher. According to him (undoubtedly via the book he was using),
Caesar Augustus came up with this really keen cipher system where you just
shift the alphabet over one letter:

ABCDEFG... becomes
BCDEFGH... (no one would be able to crack that one)

The Augustinian code was the one used for this cryptoquote and it happens to
be in Latin (get it?). Therefore, the math teacher suggests the translation
is:

"Every man is the fashioner of his own fortune -- Appius Claudius Caecus
(the code word [i.e. of the next cipher] is 'neutron' [the next cipher may
well be in English])."

Don't know if "dictum arcanum" is an adequate translation of "code word"
(wouldn't "shibboleth" or a variation thereon have been available at that
time?), (and, keep in mind, the writers of the cipher puzzles may not be the
avid Latinophiles that *we* are) but the math teacher seemed content, so who
am I to argue?

conlang@egroups.com/msg00457.html" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">http://www.mail-archive.com/conlang@egroups.com/msg00457.htm...

dictum arcanum, literally is "mysterious statement", also "secret"
Roma, means in Rome

Appius Claudius was a famous consul who built the Appian way in Rome and the acqueduct

regards

paola l m
civis romanus sum

CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 03:00
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 16
Grading comment
Thank you very much!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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