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Unde fungi ego impetro rego quod de Deus

English translation: From wherever I am serving /working, I accomplish and rule what is God's ??

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21:28 Aug 16, 2001
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Latin term or phrase: Unde fungi ego impetro rego quod de Deus
Unde fungi ego impetro rego quod de Deus
adam
English translation:From wherever I am serving /working, I accomplish and rule what is God's ??
Explanation:
To accurately translate "fungi" (from fungor as Flavio says) we should have a bit more context, since it means:
<fungor , functus, fungi, v. dep. [kindred to Sanscr. bhuj-, frui] , to busy one's self with or be engaged in something; to perform, execute, administer, discharge, observe, do (syn.: administro, defungor); constr. with abl., rarely with acc. or absol.

It is the same root of the word "function" in English.

Also, as Flavio says, there are some problems with the grammar.

Can you confirm the spelling?

For example, if impetro and rego are both verbs (first pers. sing, present tense) than a conjunction is needed between the two (impetro et rego)

Also it would be interesting to have a
bit more context in general (where is it from, author, purpose etc.)

Paola
(Civis romanus sum, hence don't condemn me too hastily!)
Selected response from:

CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 11:22
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +2From wherever I am serving /working, I accomplish and rule what is God's ??
CLS Lexi-tech
na +2Some suggestion...
flaviofbg


  

Answers


5 hrs peer agreement (net): +2
Some suggestion...


Explanation:
The phrase looks somehow strange. This is all I can say to help you:

Unde: "from where"
fungi: fungor is deponent, so I suppose this apparently passive infinitive is, really, an active infinitive. "to do something, to take that something to its final part, to end something, to make something with responsibilities"

ego impetro: I get, I obtain that...(1st singular)

rego: I rule, I administrate

quod de Deus: what talks about God, what is about God, the things about God.

Sounds a bit strange... Something must be wrong in the grammar? Please check.

A possible strange result:

"From where I do my job, I get to rule all the things that apply to God"

Hope it helped somewhat... Francesco, may you help further please?

Flavio


    Disctintion in Latin
    Translation Student
flaviofbg
Spain
Local time: 17:22
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 155

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Francesco D'Alessandro: sorry, can't make head or tail of it
1 day 10 hrs
  -> esatto... è stranissima!!!

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
1435 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 hrs peer agreement (net): +2
From wherever I am serving /working, I accomplish and rule what is God's ??


Explanation:
To accurately translate "fungi" (from fungor as Flavio says) we should have a bit more context, since it means:
<fungor , functus, fungi, v. dep. [kindred to Sanscr. bhuj-, frui] , to busy one's self with or be engaged in something; to perform, execute, administer, discharge, observe, do (syn.: administro, defungor); constr. with abl., rarely with acc. or absol.

It is the same root of the word "function" in English.

Also, as Flavio says, there are some problems with the grammar.

Can you confirm the spelling?

For example, if impetro and rego are both verbs (first pers. sing, present tense) than a conjunction is needed between the two (impetro et rego)

Also it would be interesting to have a
bit more context in general (where is it from, author, purpose etc.)

Paola
(Civis romanus sum, hence don't condemn me too hastily!)

CLS Lexi-tech
Local time: 11:22
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 16
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Francesco D'Alessandro: besides, "de" and "Deus" (nominative case) are at odds
1 day 8 hrs
  -> Absolutely, it is a real puzzle... I am curious. Adam, please tell us more!

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
1435 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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