KudoZ home » Latin to English » Poetry & Literature

Primordium Nulla Retrorsum

English translation: No progress by looking backwards

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
13:33 Dec 17, 2005
Latin to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Latin term or phrase: Primordium Nulla Retrorsum
I couldn't get a good expression in English.
Simone
English translation:No progress by looking backwards
Explanation:
Future lies ahead!
Selected response from:

irat56
France
Local time: 22:43
Grading comment
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +1No progress by looking backwards
irat56
4There's no turning back.
Joseph Brazauskas


  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
No progress by looking backwards


Explanation:
Future lies ahead!

irat56
France
Local time: 22:43
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter: Can't move forward while looking backwards.
18 days
  -> Thanks!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
There's no turning back.


Explanation:
'Nulla' presumably qualifies some such substantive as 'vestigia'. The phrase seems to be an allusion to Horace, Epistulae, 1.1.70ff.:

Quod si me populus Romanus forte roget, cur
non, ut porticibus, sic iudiciis fruar isdem,
nec sequar aut fugiam quae diligit ipse vel odit,
olim quod volpes aegroto cauta leoni
respondit referam: 'Quia me vestigia terrent,
omnia te adversum spectantia, nulla retrorsum.'

There are also extant some fragments of the satirist Lucilius (180-102 BCE), whence Horace almost certainly drew his inspiration for his own version of this Aesopic fable (Warmington, 30.1111ff.):

leonem aegrotum et lassum

inluvies scabies oculos huic deque petigo
conscendere

tristem et corruptum scabie et porriginis plenum

Deducta tunc voce leo "cur te ipsa venire
non vis huc?"

"Sed tamen hoc dicas quid sit, si noenu molestum est."

"Quid sibi vult, quare fit ut introversus et ad te
spectent atque ferant vestigia se omnia prosus?"

The moral is that, once one has committed oneself to a life of abnormalcy and excess, it is impossible to return to the natural one to which one was born.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 56
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search