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fucoque et floribus oras explent

English translation: fill the crevices With pollen from the flowers

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15:10 Nov 25, 2008
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature / Virgil
Latin term or phrase: fucoque et floribus oras explent
Greetings,

Please could you focus your explanation on “oras”, which I don’t understand at all – if it were “mouths”, wouldn’t it be “ora”?
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=fK1GqynM92AC&pg=PT229&lpg...

Many thanks in advance,

Simon
SeiTT
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:24
English translation:fill the crevices With pollen from the flowers
Explanation:
The original meaning of *ora* is any kind of *extremity*, see a very good definition in the first link.
About Virgil's Georgicon, there is an extremely good translation on the MIT website, this is where the target phrase is from. As you see, they simply avoided explaining the details of the process how the bees gain pollen from the "extremities" of the flowers...
Selected response from:

paya2008
United States
Local time: 09:24
Grading comment
many thanks excellent
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1They fill up the beaches with both smoke and flowers.
Joseph Brazauskas
4 +1fill the crevices With pollen from the flowerspaya2008


  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
They fill up the beaches with both smoke and flowers.


Explanation:
Here 'oras' is acc. fem. pl. of 'ora', 'shore, beach, strand', not to be confused with the nom. and acc. n. pl. of 'os', 'mouth'.

The smoke refers to the smoke of incense. Preparations for a sacrificial offerring are being described.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 56

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Veronika McLaren: definitely right about the "oras" but the quote is from the Georgics and the reference is to bees
25 mins
  -> Thank you for the correction, Veronika.
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48 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
fill the crevices With pollen from the flowers


Explanation:
The original meaning of *ora* is any kind of *extremity*, see a very good definition in the first link.
About Virgil's Georgicon, there is an extremely good translation on the MIT website, this is where the target phrase is from. As you see, they simply avoided explaining the details of the process how the bees gain pollen from the "extremities" of the flowers...


    Reference: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3Atex...
    Reference: http://classics.mit.edu/Virgil/georgics.4.iv.html
paya2008
United States
Local time: 09:24
Native speaker of: Native in HungarianHungarian
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
many thanks excellent

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joseph Brazauskas
22 mins

neutral  Stephen C. Farrand: The Conington Nettleship commentary (available from Google) suggests that fucoque et floribus are parallel and both refer to propolis (=bee glue) or perhaps fuco to bee glue and floribus to pollen.
4 hrs
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Changes made by editors
Nov 25, 2008 - Changes made by Veronica Prpic Uhing:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


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