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"In principii" versus "in principiati"

English translation: "principles or causes" vs "effects"

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:"In principii" versus "in principiati"
English translation:"principles or causes" vs "effects"
Entered by: Ladda McLaren
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00:36 Feb 24, 2012
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Religion
Latin term or phrase: "In principii" versus "in principiati"
Hello,

I am trying to understand the difference between these two terms that are in the same line. As understand them, they mean the same but why the distinction "iis/iatis"? Is it something grammatical?

"Vita hominis in principiis sit in cerebris, et in principiatis in corpore"

Thank you very much in advance if someone could give some light into this.

Explanations in Spanish, Portuguese, English or French are welcomed.
Angela C.
Local time: 19:46
"principles or causes" vs "effects"
Explanation:
The excerpt you give seems to come from a philosophical text, and in the philosophical literature from St. Thomas to St. Gregory of Nyssa, as well as many more modern examples such as Kant and Hildebrand, all seem to make reference to principium vs principiatum, ie. cause vs. effect. So your phrase means, "The life of a man should consist in the mind with respect to principles/causes, and in the body with respect to effects", or perhaps even better, "The life of a man should consist first and foremost in the mind and secondarily in the body."
Selected response from:

Ladda McLaren
Local time: 18:46
Grading comment
Thank you very much.
The cause v/s effect explanation makes sense. I like the how is illustrated in your second example. You are right about the text being philosophical and I did look into the St. Thomas Aquinas text but still couldn't get that meaning.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4In respect of origins let the human way of life lie (be) in brains, and in respect of the beginning
Joseph Brazauskas
3"principles or causes" vs "effects"Ladda McLaren


  

Answers


11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
In respect of origins let the human way of life lie (be) in brains, and in respect of the beginning


Explanation:
'In respect of origins let the human way of life lie (be) in brains, and in respect of the beginnings of speech in the body."

'Principiatis' appears to be the perfect passive participle of 'principiare', 'to begin to speak', used substantively.

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Note added at 11 hrs (2012-02-24 11:50:51 GMT)
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'Sit' appears to be an hortatory subjunctive.

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you for your help, Joseph. It is very much appreciated!

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1 day3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
"principles or causes" vs "effects"


Explanation:
The excerpt you give seems to come from a philosophical text, and in the philosophical literature from St. Thomas to St. Gregory of Nyssa, as well as many more modern examples such as Kant and Hildebrand, all seem to make reference to principium vs principiatum, ie. cause vs. effect. So your phrase means, "The life of a man should consist in the mind with respect to principles/causes, and in the body with respect to effects", or perhaps even better, "The life of a man should consist first and foremost in the mind and secondarily in the body."

Ladda McLaren
Local time: 18:46
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in CroatianCroatian, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you very much.
The cause v/s effect explanation makes sense. I like the how is illustrated in your second example. You are right about the text being philosophical and I did look into the St. Thomas Aquinas text but still couldn't get that meaning.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Sorry for my mistake in the comment; I didn't delete properly what I was writing. It should have said: "I like how it is illustrated in your second example".

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Changes made by editors
Feb 27, 2012 - Changes made by Ladda McLaren:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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