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citius altius fortius

English translation: Faster, higher, stronger.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Latin term or phrase:citius altius fortius
English translation:Faster, higher, stronger.
Entered by: Egmont
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21:45 Sep 22, 2000
Latin to English translations [PRO]
Sports / Fitness / Recreation
Latin term or phrase: citius altius fortius
These are the Latin words under the Olympic symbol. I think they might mean swift, high and strong; if I guessed correctly, is the most accurate translation: swifter, higher, stronger or swiftest, highest, strongest?
A. K. Jones
Faster, higher, stronger.
Explanation:
These are three ADVERBS in the comparative degree. They are spelled identically with the equivalent neuter accusative adjectives. They are not actually adjectives (which would be "citior, altior, fortior.")

Except for the resultant leaden English tone (and tone is always important in translating), one might even translate as: "More swiftly," etc.

The positive degree adverbs (the "dictionary forms") are, respectively: CITO, ALTE, FORTITER. There is no corresponting adjective for "cito", but for there others there are the adjectives ALTUS and FORTIS.
Selected response from:

Wigtil
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
na +4swifter, higher, stronger
Mats Wiman
4Keep the latin words
Christine HOUDY
na +3Faster, higher, stronger.Wigtil


  

Answers


33 mins peer agreement (net): +4
swifter, higher, stronger


Explanation:
definitely the comparative


    4 years of latin
Mats Wiman
Sweden
Local time: 06:53
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Denise Pepin: 100% comparative (we call that in French "comparatif absolu" because there is no "than". Would that be "absolute comparative" in English ???
2088 days

agree  Red Cat Studios
2257 days

agree  irat56
2257 days

agree  chaplin: I wish I was!!
2278 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

16 hrs peer agreement (net): +3
Faster, higher, stronger.


Explanation:
These are three ADVERBS in the comparative degree. They are spelled identically with the equivalent neuter accusative adjectives. They are not actually adjectives (which would be "citior, altior, fortior.")

Except for the resultant leaden English tone (and tone is always important in translating), one might even translate as: "More swiftly," etc.

The positive degree adverbs (the "dictionary forms") are, respectively: CITO, ALTE, FORTITER. There is no corresponting adjective for "cito", but for there others there are the adjectives ALTUS and FORTIS.


Wigtil
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Egmont
728 days

agree  Cristina Chaplin
2242 days

agree  irat56
2257 days
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2247 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Keep the latin words


Explanation:
If I were you, I won't translate the latin words into french. If you want to, write the translation into brackets

Christine HOUDY
France
Local time: 06:53
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
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Changes made by editors
Jun 25, 2006 - Changes made by Tony M:
Field (specific)(none) » Sports / Fitness / Recreation


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