KudoZ home » Latin to Japanese » Art/Literary

carpe noctem

Japanese translation: yoru o ikiru (see link for characters)

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
09:59 Jul 7, 2000
Latin to Japanese translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Latin term or phrase: carpe noctem
Carpe noctem in english means seize the night, I want to see the japanese characters for this translation. They should read "carpe noctem" though and not "seize the night" Please help me out here, it is a latin to japanese translation.
Candice Price
Japanese translation:yoru o ikiru (see link for characters)
Explanation:
The title of the film "Dead Poets Society" which made the concept conveyed by an interpretation of
"Carpe Diem" famous in Japan, was "Ima o Ikiru" (literally "live now"), after the same phrase.

Carpe Diem. Sieze the day, boys. Make your lives extraordinary.
Mr. Keating, played by Robin Williams, in "Dead Poets Society."

Following the same tradition, "Carpe Noctem" could be translated as "Yoru o Ikiru", literally "Live the Night".

You expressed an interest in the Japanese characters, which can be found at the following links. The first uses the character for ikiru used in the film title which means "live"

http://www.mii.kurume-u.ac.jp/~leuers/yoruoikiru.jpg

The second uses the character for ikiru meaning "make the most of," which, were it not for the fact that it leaves the above tradition and is thus even more unnatural, I would prefer.

http://www.mii.kurume-u.ac.jp/~leuers/yoruoikiru2.jpg
Selected response from:

Timothy Takemoto
Local time: 19:33
Grading comment
Thank you for the informative answer, however the links you provided did not work. If you know of any more, or can simply email me
with the characters in a jpg attachment, I would be very grateful. Thank you anyway if not.
Razorblade_angel@hotmail.com
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
nayoru o ikiru (see link for characters)
Timothy Takemoto


  

Answers


12 days
yoru o ikiru (see link for characters)


Explanation:
The title of the film "Dead Poets Society" which made the concept conveyed by an interpretation of
"Carpe Diem" famous in Japan, was "Ima o Ikiru" (literally "live now"), after the same phrase.

Carpe Diem. Sieze the day, boys. Make your lives extraordinary.
Mr. Keating, played by Robin Williams, in "Dead Poets Society."

Following the same tradition, "Carpe Noctem" could be translated as "Yoru o Ikiru", literally "Live the Night".

You expressed an interest in the Japanese characters, which can be found at the following links. The first uses the character for ikiru used in the film title which means "live"

http://www.mii.kurume-u.ac.jp/~leuers/yoruoikiru.jpg

The second uses the character for ikiru meaning "make the most of," which, were it not for the fact that it leaves the above tradition and is thus even more unnatural, I would prefer.

http://www.mii.kurume-u.ac.jp/~leuers/yoruoikiru2.jpg



    Reference: http://www.geocities.com/CollegePark/5552/dps.htm
Timothy Takemoto
Local time: 19:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 3
Grading comment
Thank you for the informative answer, however the links you provided did not work. If you know of any more, or can simply email me
with the characters in a jpg attachment, I would be very grateful. Thank you anyway if not.
Razorblade_angel@hotmail.com
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search