latawiec

English translation: latawiec + explanation

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Polish term or phrase:latawiec
English translation:latawiec + explanation
Entered by: Michał Janowski

13:25 Nov 9, 2012
Polish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Folklore / duchy i stworzenia fantastyczne
Polish term or phrase: latawiec
Apparently this also is some sort of evil spirit/jakiś latający duch domowy
Michał Janowski
Local time: 23:27
latawiec + explanation
Explanation:
Latawiec (female form - Latawica)
A male or female night/air demon. There was a connection between falling stars and Latawiec/Latawica. The demons excelled at seducing wives and husbands. Latawiec(-ica's) victim would quickly become obsessed with love, would avoid home and family, dance and singing. He/She would often visit the place of first meeting with Latawiec/Latawica, or wander around aimlessly. The love could drive victim insane, and he/she usually soon died.
Appearance: beautiful, young, charming men and women. No one would be able to reject them.
Defense: carry garlic with you.
Genesis: souls of young men and women.

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Note added at 21 mins (2012-11-09 13:46:43 GMT)
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Nav'
The Naw in Polish and Nav' in other Slavic languages are ghosts or the souls of persons that had met a tragic or premature death, particularly unchristened babies.

The term descends from PIE *navus ("corpse"), being cognate to Gothic naus ("dead"), Old Prussian nowis ("corpse"), and Tocharian naut ("to perish").
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Navi are Slavic demons, and in mythology they were the personification of death, kingdom of the dead and lord of Underground, or demons that were made from the souls of stillborn and unbaptized children. In the Bulgarian tradition imagined in the form of birds, with terrifying screams in the dark nights circling around the house and attacked pregnant women, nursing mothers and children. The Serbs and Croats called them nekrštenci or nevidinčići and imagined as a large bird with a children's heads. These are evil spirits that attack unbaptized children and nursing mothers. Farmers in particular are afraid of nekrštenci, who subtract milk from cows, sheep and goats. In Ukraine and Poland have imagined in a human or animal form, and called poterčuk or latawiec.

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Note added at 21 mins (2012-11-09 13:47:23 GMT)
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http://forum.slavorum.com/index.php?topic=2728.15
Selected response from:

Darius Saczuk
United States
Grading comment
Serdecznie dziękuję
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +2latawiec + explanation
Darius Saczuk


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
latawiec + explanation


Explanation:
Latawiec (female form - Latawica)
A male or female night/air demon. There was a connection between falling stars and Latawiec/Latawica. The demons excelled at seducing wives and husbands. Latawiec(-ica's) victim would quickly become obsessed with love, would avoid home and family, dance and singing. He/She would often visit the place of first meeting with Latawiec/Latawica, or wander around aimlessly. The love could drive victim insane, and he/she usually soon died.
Appearance: beautiful, young, charming men and women. No one would be able to reject them.
Defense: carry garlic with you.
Genesis: souls of young men and women.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 mins (2012-11-09 13:46:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Nav'
The Naw in Polish and Nav' in other Slavic languages are ghosts or the souls of persons that had met a tragic or premature death, particularly unchristened babies.

The term descends from PIE *navus ("corpse"), being cognate to Gothic naus ("dead"), Old Prussian nowis ("corpse"), and Tocharian naut ("to perish").
-----------------
Navi are Slavic demons, and in mythology they were the personification of death, kingdom of the dead and lord of Underground, or demons that were made from the souls of stillborn and unbaptized children. In the Bulgarian tradition imagined in the form of birds, with terrifying screams in the dark nights circling around the house and attacked pregnant women, nursing mothers and children. The Serbs and Croats called them nekrštenci or nevidinčići and imagined as a large bird with a children's heads. These are evil spirits that attack unbaptized children and nursing mothers. Farmers in particular are afraid of nekrštenci, who subtract milk from cows, sheep and goats. In Ukraine and Poland have imagined in a human or animal form, and called poterčuk or latawiec.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 mins (2012-11-09 13:47:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://forum.slavorum.com/index.php?topic=2728.15

Darius Saczuk
United States
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Serdecznie dziękuję

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joanna Chułek
15 mins
  -> Dzięki, Joanna. :-)

agree  JacekP: Jak najbardziej popieram, ale... już sobie wyobrażam Anglika starającego się przeczytać to słowo:)
2 hrs
  -> Znam z autopsji. ;-) Dzięki, Jacek. :-)
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