obszar komórkowy

English translation: cell area/cell

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Polish term or phrase:obszar komórkowy
English translation:cell area/cell
Entered by: Frank Szmulowicz, Ph. D.

12:19 Dec 17, 2018
Polish to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Telecom(munications)
Polish term or phrase: obszar komórkowy
"zagęszczenie obszarów komórkowych dla osiągnięcia dużych przepustowości sieci"
hanna_sz
Local time: 10:58
cell area/cell
Explanation:
With cellular radio, a simple hexagon is used to represent a complex object: the geographical area covered by cellular radio antennas. These areas are called “cells.” This shape lets us picture the cellular idea on a map, because when displaying a cellular system we want to depict an area totally covered by radio—without any gaps. Any cellular system will have gaps in coverage, but the hexagonal shape lets us neatly visualize, in theory, how the system is laid out.

By definition, a cell site gives radio coverage to a cell. The cell site is a location or a point; the cell is a wide geographical area. The picture illustrates the cell structure. Some people historically saw the cell as the blue hexagon shown, being defined by the cell site in the center and the antenna coverage being the coverage of the hexagon surrounding it. This held true for historical omni-directional antenna systems. As new directional antenna systems have been deployed, the cell site and the cell required clearer definition, as more sectors or cells are associated to a cell site.

In reality in today’s systems, the cells are the red hexagons, with the cell sites or base stations at the corners. Rather than referring to a “three-sectored cell,” it is more appropriate to refer to the three “cells” associated with a single base station, and as it happens, each is a sector. In addition, rather than those three cells being enclosed in a single hexagon, each cell is represented by its own hexagon. So in effect, sectors and cells are the same thing in a three-sector situation
https://www.commscope.com/uploadedImages/CommScope.com/Blog/...
https://www.commscope.com/Blog/Cells--Sectors-and-Antenna-Be...
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https://slideplayer.pl/slide/1215905/
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As the phone user moves from one cell area to another cell while a call is in progress, the mobile station will search for a new channel to attach to in order not to drop the call. Once a new channel is found, the network will command the mobile unit to switch to the new channel and at the same time switch the call onto the new channel.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cellular_network
Selected response from:

Frank Szmulowicz, Ph. D.
United States
Local time: 04:58
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +1cell area/cell
Frank Szmulowicz, Ph. D.


  

Answers


37 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
cell area/cell


Explanation:
With cellular radio, a simple hexagon is used to represent a complex object: the geographical area covered by cellular radio antennas. These areas are called “cells.” This shape lets us picture the cellular idea on a map, because when displaying a cellular system we want to depict an area totally covered by radio—without any gaps. Any cellular system will have gaps in coverage, but the hexagonal shape lets us neatly visualize, in theory, how the system is laid out.

By definition, a cell site gives radio coverage to a cell. The cell site is a location or a point; the cell is a wide geographical area. The picture illustrates the cell structure. Some people historically saw the cell as the blue hexagon shown, being defined by the cell site in the center and the antenna coverage being the coverage of the hexagon surrounding it. This held true for historical omni-directional antenna systems. As new directional antenna systems have been deployed, the cell site and the cell required clearer definition, as more sectors or cells are associated to a cell site.

In reality in today’s systems, the cells are the red hexagons, with the cell sites or base stations at the corners. Rather than referring to a “three-sectored cell,” it is more appropriate to refer to the three “cells” associated with a single base station, and as it happens, each is a sector. In addition, rather than those three cells being enclosed in a single hexagon, each cell is represented by its own hexagon. So in effect, sectors and cells are the same thing in a three-sector situation
https://www.commscope.com/uploadedImages/CommScope.com/Blog/...
https://www.commscope.com/Blog/Cells--Sectors-and-Antenna-Be...
ccccccc

https://slideplayer.pl/slide/1215905/
ccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccccc

As the phone user moves from one cell area to another cell while a call is in progress, the mobile station will search for a new channel to attach to in order not to drop the call. Once a new channel is found, the network will command the mobile unit to switch to the new channel and at the same time switch the call onto the new channel.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cellular_network

Frank Szmulowicz, Ph. D.
United States
Local time: 04:58
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PolishPolish
PRO pts in category: 44

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bartosz Bachurski: I guess cell is enough.
3 mins
  -> Thank you, Bartosz. I was wondering whether cell density is enough for zagęszczenie obszarów komórkowych. I think it may be enough.
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