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kierezja

English translation: 'kierezja' man's coat

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08:48 Nov 26, 2013
Polish to English translations [PRO]
Folklore
Polish term or phrase: kierezja
"Krakowskie" kostiumy balowe a także kuligowe, zazwyczaj bogato zdobione i znacznie odbiegające od prawdziwego stroju ludowego, były równocześnie przejawem przekonania o wyjątkowej urodzie krakowskich ubiorów ludowych. Sięgało ono jeszcze ostatnich dziesięcioleci XVIII wieku, a jego wyrazem były zapewne "krakowskie" kostiumy baletu króla Stanisława Augusta Poniatowskiego. Wydaje się, iż przebrania męskie, w których zamiast białej sukmany "kościuszkowskiej" ze stojącym kołnierzem występowała sukmana - kierezja z dużym kołnierzem opadającym na plecy, nawiązywały w dużej mierze do tej właśnie, starszej tradycji.
awdotia
Poland
Local time: 22:58
English translation:'kierezja' man's coat
Explanation:
Tak proponuję, bo to nazwa części odzieży noszonej w przeszłości w regionie krakowskim. Takich nazw nie tłumaczy się.

kierezja f reg embroidered coat (Krakow region)
www.scribd.com/doc/122424401/Dictionary-Polish-English

The "kierezja" coat once worn by peasants and townspeople was until recently the common coat in the arcas east and north of Cracow
booksnow1.scholarsportal.info/ebooks/.../polskiestrojelud00manu.pdf‎
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Andrzej Mierzejewski
Poland
Local time: 22:58
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2'kierezja' man's coat
Andrzej Mierzejewski
3kersey (coat)
geopiet


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
'kierezja' man's coat


Explanation:
Tak proponuję, bo to nazwa części odzieży noszonej w przeszłości w regionie krakowskim. Takich nazw nie tłumaczy się.

kierezja f reg embroidered coat (Krakow region)
www.scribd.com/doc/122424401/Dictionary-Polish-English

The "kierezja" coat once worn by peasants and townspeople was until recently the common coat in the arcas east and north of Cracow
booksnow1.scholarsportal.info/ebooks/.../polskiestrojelud00manu.pdf‎

Andrzej Mierzejewski
Poland
Local time: 22:58
Native speaker of: Polish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxGeorge BuLah: oczywiście! || bo inaczej to - herezja :)
3 mins
  -> :-)

agree  Serenadele
7 mins
  -> :-)
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
kersey (coat)


Explanation:

White sukmana coat – “chrzanówka”

Dimensions height: 116 cm, width: back = 44 cm, bottom = 105 cm
ID no.: MNPE/E 225
Museum Museum – Vistula Ethnographic Park in Wygiełzów and Lipowiec Castle
Subjects daily life, clothing
Technique hand sewing
Fabric cream and red cloth, maroon string
Tags strój, sukmana, kultura ludowa, Chrzanów

The sukmana coat, formerly known as an outer garment, was commonly worn on Sundays and festivals by the inhabitants of Krakow villages. It was made of white cloth formerly manufactured, for example, by drapers from Chrzanów (even in the early 20th century, about a dozen families living in Chrzanów were still involved in this craft). Cloth made of spun wool was purchased from merchants from Biała. Depending on the recipient, tailors used a various finish of sukmana coats. Thanks to this, it was possible to identify the origin of the person wearing a given piece of clothing by the colour of the fringe. In some places, they were red, while in others – black.
This sukmnana coat was purchased for the museum collection in 1965 from Zofia Szklarska from Krakow. It was made of white cloth with red lapels and was decorated with maroon fringes. It has the back cut of one piece of cloth fitted at the waist. From the waist down, there are gussets on the sides with single vents at the bottom. The coat has a stand-up collar of a trapezoid shape. The tapering sleeves are ended with pulled cuffs and vents closed with two hooks. In the front there are visible cuts masking the pockets. A red hem runs along the edges of the coat, the vents of gussets and pockets. In the front, there are 12 hooks up to the waist and beside them there is a maroon string sewn in. Everything is decorated with maroon fringes on a collar: two at the back and two at the front, six on each side, in four lines at the waist, and one at each vent at the bottom. This exhibit comes from the village of Zalas.
Elaborated by Marcin Koziołek (Museum – Vistula Ethnographic Park in Wygiełzów and Lipowiec Castle [Muzeum – Nadwiślański Park Etnograficzny w Wygiełzowie i Zamek Lipowiec])
Men's Bronowice costume
Krakow costumes come in two principal variants: costumes of the western inhabitants of Krakow (villages located in northern and in the north-eastern outskirts of the city of Krakow, nowadays mostly a part of the city itself) and the eastern inhabitants of Krakow (areas east of Krakow, behind a symbolic line of Jędrzejów – Miechów – Proszowice – Koszyce and between Bochnia and Brzesko). It is thought that the basic determinant of this division is the type of sukmana coat used in a given area. The western inhabitants of Krakow wore sukmana coats with mandarin collars and red trimming, whereas the eastern inhabitants of Krakow wore a kersey, mostly brown with a large triangular collar falling onto the back. The presented attire of the western inhabitant of Krakow dates back to the turn of the 20th century and was used to attend church masses and other celebrations. The most characteristic element was the white sukmana coat (chrzanówka), a typical piece of men's outerwear around Krakow. In the area of Bronowice and other villages west of 19th-century Krakow, it was ornamented with bundles of threads (chwast), amaranthine or red; in villages situated east of Krakow, the bundles of threads were black. Until World War I, sukmana coats were commonly worn on Sundays and on holidays in villages near Krakow. These sukmana coats were sewn by Chrzanów tailors (the history of the Chrzanów tailors’ guild dates back to the 16th century), and hence the name chrzanówka. Tailors stopped sewing sukmana coats in the first decade of the 20th century as cloth produced by cloth-makers was increasingly scarce.
Sukmana coats were worn over sleeveless tunics. The tunic was a typical element of Krakow's lavishly decorated male clothing. Besides sleeveless tunics, there were also sleeved tunics. Sleeveless tunics were usually worn under a sukmana coat, whereas sleeved tunics were put on over outerwear. They were the most lavishly decorated part of a man's clothing, and tunics from Bronowice and villages north and north-west of Bronowice are recognised as the most famous and most lavishly decorated ones. Tunics were trimmed with several rows of pearl buttons and amaranthine or red bundles of threads on the front, on the pocket lapels, by the collar and on the back side of the tunic at the waist. The colour of the thread bundles strictly correlated with the colour of thread bundles on the chrzanówka. For a tunic with amaranthine or red bundles of threads, one would wear a sukmana coat with bundles of threads of the same colour, whereas for a tunic with green bundles of threads, Krakow peasants would choose a chrzanówka with black bundles of threads. The tunic was girded with a wide leather belt (trzos).
An opasek belt is a kind of a trzos belt, i.e. a double belt made by folding a piece of leather vertically and sewing it together with a thong. Trzos belts were used in Poland as early as the 16th century. In the mid-19th century, peasants living in and around Stary Sącz and Nowy Sącz wore trzos belts made of eel skin. Due to shape- and technique-related differences, we can divide trzos belts into Krakow trzos belts and highlander trzos belts. The Opasek belt was worn north, west and south of Krakow. It was made of fine calfskin and was between 10 and 25 cm wide. It did not encircle the waist entirely; it needed to be extended with a leather strap onto which the belt itself was mounted. Below the tunic there was a white linen shirt with an embroidered collar fastened with a collar stud decorated with a coral bead, or a red ribbon. Western inhabitants of Krakow wore white trousers with red stripes (portki) (white linen trousers with vertical stripes, mostly red, sometimes pink or blue, in winter – often dark cloth trousers), stuck into black leather knee-high boots. A westerner wore a felt hat – celender or magierka, i.e. a round men's woollen hat with a characteristic shape, knit with the stocking stitch, subjected to fulling and modelled, produced mainly in Tyniec. On the occasion of holidays, Krakow inhabitants wore four-cornered hats decorated with peacock feathers.
Krakow inhabitants' attire was formed completely in the late 18th century, and a breakthrough in its history was the events connected with the Kościuszko Uprising (1794) and the symbolic gesture of Tadeusz Kościuszko putting on a white peasant sukmana coat. Ever since, the wearing of a white sukmana coat with red facings and a red four-cornered hat, colours alluding to the national colours became a kind of one's manifestation of their patriotism. The career of the Krakow costume involved its breaking regional barriers and barriers related to the social strata. As a result, in the 19th century, the costume grew into the national attire. The Racławice theme also appeared in historiography, literature and paintings. Its inextricable element was the Krakow male costume, faithfully represented in paintings by Jan Matejko Kościuszko pod Racławicami (Kościuszko at Racławice), Włodzimierz Tetmajer's Racławice triptych or Wojciech Kossak's and Jan Styka's Panorama Racławicka (Racławice Panorama). The Kościuszko Uprising gave rise to military uniforms being modelled after Krakow sukmana coats, worn by Krakow regiments fighting in subsequent national uprisings. The white sukmana coat and red four-cornered hat came to symbolise the struggle for independence.
Between the late 18th century and the early 20th century, this form of clothing also became a model for sleigh rides and ball costumes. It was also then that a fad emerged for dressing servants in excessively ornamented kerseys, modelled after peasant sukmana coats. At that time, stylised Krakow attire could also be seen on the theatre stage, among others in the opéra bouffe, Cud mniemany, czyli Krakowiacy i Górale (The Presumed Miracle, or Cracovians and Highlanders) with a libretto by Wojciech Bogusławski (1794). Additionally, the way the inhabitants of Krakow villages dressed was the inspiration behind the costumes in the first Polish national ballet, Wesele w Ojcowie (Wedding in Ojców) by Karol Kurpiński (1823).
Since the mid-19th century, Krakow saw the emergence of escorts of horsemen clad in white sukmana coats and red four-cornered hats, which accompanied church and national ceremonies and rich weddings. This phenomenon undoubtedly crossed regional boundaries.
The last decades of the 19th century and the early 20th century saw the heyday of ornamentation in the costume of the Krakow peasantry (Bronowice, Mogiła), which coincided with Young Poland artists' fascination with the culture of the Krakow peasants. The culture of Bronowice gained particular fame; it can be admired in paintings by Tetmajer, Wodzianowski and Żelichowski. The huge popularity of the costume was consolidated by Stanisław Wyspiański's Wesele (Wedding), a drama based on poet Lucjan Rydel's wedding with a peasant girl, Jadwiga Mikołajczykówna of Bronowice Małe. Costumes for the première of the performance held in 1901, modelled after Krakow costumes, were designed by the writer himself. What shows the impact power of the Krakow dress is the fact that in the early 20th century the term “Krakow fashion” came to symbolise colourfulness, ornamentation, richness in other regional costumes and also the frequent participation of Krakow men and women in church and state ceremonies as a way of dignifying those events.
In the 20th century, the Krakow region saw a fad for replacing the costly peasant dress with cheaper factory-made clothing. The folk costume was occasionally used as the national and representative attire worn during state and church ceremonies and folk festivities. For Polish emigrants, the clothing was a symbol of their connection with their home country (the Krakow attire played a similar role after WWII).
Nowadays, as a result of the growth of popularity and new roles that the clothing, originally meant for Krakow peasantry's costume used for church masses and holidays, came to play, the Krakow costume, functioning now primarily as a disguise, has sometimes substantially diverged from what genuine Krakow attire looks like. Just as centuries ago, however, it inspires artists and creative professionals. Processed and reproduced, it has become Krakow's inextricable image product.

http://goo.gl/AjRM18

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Kierezja (ang. kersey - grube sukno z długiej wełny) - bogato wyszywana sukmana krakowska z dużym haftowanym kołnierzem, który był wykładany na plecy. - http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kierezja

geopiet
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Andrzej Mierzejewski: IMO to może być tylko informacja o etymologii wyrazu. Powstrzymałbym się od stosowania nazwy rodzaju sukna jako nazwy dla tego rodzaju płaszcza.
1 hr
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