KudoZ home » Polish to English » Linguistics

niewypał

English translation: 1. a dud 2. a damp squib

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Polish term or phrase:niewypał
English translation:1. a dud 2. a damp squib
Entered by: Caryl Swift
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

18:47 Jan 20, 2008
Polish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics
Polish term or phrase: niewypał
W znaczeniu niewypał z fajerwerków
czer
1. a dud 2. a damp squib
Explanation:
I know it's not the done thing to give two answers, but so much depends on the context and you haven't really given us any. A firework that doesn't go off is most definitely a dud. However, even if the firework is e.g. a rocket or a Catherine wheel, rather than a squib, the expression 'damp squib' could also be used and would not only be absolutely acceptable, but also has the advantage of a second, metaphoric meaning.
-----------------------------------------------------
dud informal
n noun
1 a thing that fails to work properly.
ORIGIN
Middle English: of unknown origin.
--------------------------------------------------------
squib
n noun
1 a small firework that hisses before exploding.
ORIGIN
C16: of unknown origin; perhaps imitative of a small explosion.
(Both from "The Concise Oxford English Dictionary)
----------------------------------------------------------
squib (skwb)
n.
1.
a. A small firecracker.
b. A broken firecracker that burns but does not explode
(From: http://tinyurl.com/2uuuf8)
--------------------------------------------------------------
[edit] Origin of the phrase "damp squib"
Being an explosive, cheaper uninsulated squibs need to be kept dry in order to ignite, so a "damp squib" is literally one that fails to ignite because it got wet. The phrase "damp squib" has since come into general use to mean anything that fails to meet expectations.[5] The word "squib" has come to take on a similar meaning even when used alone, sometimes referring to a firecracker that fails to fully explode,[6] or a bullet that fails to leave the gun barrel (similar in meaning to the word "dud").
(From: http://tinyurl.com/2vamnr)
Selected response from:

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 14:22
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +2unexploded firework (shell)
Dariusz Saczuk
2 +21. a dud 2. a damp squib
Caryl Swift
3flop
Andrew Stanleyson


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
flop


Explanation:
maybe

Andrew Stanleyson
Local time: 14:22
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
unexploded firework (shell)


Explanation:
Tak oto.

Dariusz Saczuk
United States
Local time: 08:22
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish
PRO pts in category: 113

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Grzegorz Mysiński
2 hrs
  -> Dziękuję.

agree  Polangmar
6 hrs
  -> Dziękuję.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
1. a dud 2. a damp squib


Explanation:
I know it's not the done thing to give two answers, but so much depends on the context and you haven't really given us any. A firework that doesn't go off is most definitely a dud. However, even if the firework is e.g. a rocket or a Catherine wheel, rather than a squib, the expression 'damp squib' could also be used and would not only be absolutely acceptable, but also has the advantage of a second, metaphoric meaning.
-----------------------------------------------------
dud informal
n noun
1 a thing that fails to work properly.
ORIGIN
Middle English: of unknown origin.
--------------------------------------------------------
squib
n noun
1 a small firework that hisses before exploding.
ORIGIN
C16: of unknown origin; perhaps imitative of a small explosion.
(Both from "The Concise Oxford English Dictionary)
----------------------------------------------------------
squib (skwb)
n.
1.
a. A small firecracker.
b. A broken firecracker that burns but does not explode
(From: http://tinyurl.com/2uuuf8)
--------------------------------------------------------------
[edit] Origin of the phrase "damp squib"
Being an explosive, cheaper uninsulated squibs need to be kept dry in order to ignite, so a "damp squib" is literally one that fails to ignite because it got wet. The phrase "damp squib" has since come into general use to mean anything that fails to meet expectations.[5] The word "squib" has come to take on a similar meaning even when used alone, sometimes referring to a firecracker that fails to fully explode,[6] or a bullet that fails to leave the gun barrel (similar in meaning to the word "dud").
(From: http://tinyurl.com/2vamnr)

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 14:22
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 28
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Polangmar
3 hrs
  -> Thank you :-)

agree  allp
3 hrs
  -> Thank you :-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


Changes made by editors
Feb 6, 2008 - Changes made by Caryl Swift:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/555959">Caryl Swift's</a> old entry - "niewypał" » "1. a dud 2. a damp squib"
Feb 6, 2008 - Changes made by Caryl Swift:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search