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okrężność

English translation: circularity

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Polish term or phrase:okrężność
English translation:circularity
Entered by: Frank MacroJanus
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15:26 Nov 16, 2013
Polish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Photography/Imaging (& Graphic Arts) / philosophy of photography
Polish term or phrase: okrężność
Jednym z najoczywistszych sposobów doświadczania czasu jest następstwo zdarzeń, które możemy uszeregować według relacji „wcześniej” i „później”. Możliwe wydaje się wyprowadzenie jednowymiarowości lub okrężności z porządku przyczynowego, przedstawionego w zdjęciu.
majik
Local time: 18:50
circularity
Explanation:
What else?

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Note added at 20 mins (2013-11-16 15:47:26 GMT)
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Time has traditionally been viewed as either like a circle or like a line. Plato, Aristotle and many other Greek and Roman thinkers, particularly the Stoics, advocated a circular view of time. Linear time first appeared in Hebrew and Zoroastrian Iranian writings. Seneca was an advocate of linear time. Augustine thought time was specifically like a line segment. It had a distinct beginning and end, from Genesis to judgement day. Later on Aquinas agreed, and even further on Newton mathematically represented time as a line in his equations. Prominent thinkers such as Barrow, Leibniz, Locke and Kant all agreed with a linear type of time, and in the 19th century time was widely regarded, in both philosophy and science, like a line. It wasn't until 1949, when Kurt Godel, working with Einstein's equations, developed "closed loops of proper time", which are semi-circular in that they allow one to end up where they started after going forward in time. (From the internet encylopedia of philosophy - http://www.iep.utm.edu/t/time.htm)
Selected response from:

Frank MacroJanus
United States
Local time: 12:50
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +2circularity
Frank MacroJanus
3 +1circularity of cause and effectmike23


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
circularity of cause and effect


Explanation:
I've seen such a term. Hope it is the one sought

mike23
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:50
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Frank MacroJanus: In the sentence, "the causal order" relates to "the cause and effect," of course. However, I wonder whether this is not about an artistic/inner perception of time.
18 mins
  -> Cheers. Artistic perception of a sequence of events, you mean? Who knows. I was also thinking of circular causality referring to mutual interactions of causes and consequences. anyway
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
circularity


Explanation:
What else?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 mins (2013-11-16 15:47:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Time has traditionally been viewed as either like a circle or like a line. Plato, Aristotle and many other Greek and Roman thinkers, particularly the Stoics, advocated a circular view of time. Linear time first appeared in Hebrew and Zoroastrian Iranian writings. Seneca was an advocate of linear time. Augustine thought time was specifically like a line segment. It had a distinct beginning and end, from Genesis to judgement day. Later on Aquinas agreed, and even further on Newton mathematically represented time as a line in his equations. Prominent thinkers such as Barrow, Leibniz, Locke and Kant all agreed with a linear type of time, and in the 19th century time was widely regarded, in both philosophy and science, like a line. It wasn't until 1949, when Kurt Godel, working with Einstein's equations, developed "closed loops of proper time", which are semi-circular in that they allow one to end up where they started after going forward in time. (From the internet encylopedia of philosophy - http://www.iep.utm.edu/t/time.htm)


Frank MacroJanus
United States
Local time: 12:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PolishPolish
PRO pts in category: 19

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joanna Carroll
3 mins
  -> I am most grateful for your support here.

agree  mike23: Seems we are on the same wavelength
4 mins
  -> Thanks. It must be superluminal mental telepathy via tachyons (which would violate the cause and effect hypothesis).
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Changes made by editors
Nov 21, 2013 - Changes made by Frank MacroJanus:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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