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Se correr o bicho pega, se ficar o bicho come

English translation: to be between the devil and the deep blue sea

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Portuguese term or phrase:Se correr o bicho pega, se ficar o bicho come
English translation:to be between the devil and the deep blue sea
Entered by: Jorge Rodrigues
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

22:43 Feb 26, 2012
Portuguese to English translations [PRO]
Computers: Systems, Networks
Portuguese term or phrase: Se correr o bicho pega, se ficar o bicho come
I really wonder how one would translate this expression into American English? Not a literal translation of course because we know a native will never know what in the heck you're talking about...LOL. Any suggestions?


Thanks! :)
Mary Palmer
United States
Local time: 07:24
to be between the devil and the deep blue sea
Explanation:
A possibility.
Selected response from:

Jorge Rodrigues
Brazil
Local time: 08:24
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4to be between the devil and the deep blue sea
Jorge Rodrigues
4 +3catch 22 situation
Gilmar Fernandes
4 +2Jump from the frying pan into the fireghostwriter-BR
3 +1"between a rock and a hard place"
Mariana Hungria
4Damned if you do, damned if you don't.Maria Amaral
3no way outAirton J Souza
3You can run but you can't hide
Maria Stella Translator (BR-PT)


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
to be between the devil and the deep blue sea


Explanation:
A possibility.

Jorge Rodrigues
Brazil
Local time: 08:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sheryle Oliver: The best so far, considering that the /bicho/ is rather devilish.
58 mins
  -> Thanks, Sheryle.

agree  NataliaAnne: This works! Have to admit, though, that I’d never heard of it before your post.
12 hrs
  -> Thanks, Natalia. I heard it from an American teacher when I studied English... quite some time. Maybe this expression is outdated. :-)

agree  Daniel Tavares: Vejam a explicação de "to be between the devil..." e de "to be between a rock..." na wikipedia. Ambas as expressões são bastante usadas em inglês e tem exatamente o mesmo sentido de "se correr o bicho pega".
14 hrs
  -> Obrigado, Daniel.

agree  ghostwriter-BR: Sem desmerecer as outras respostas, também gostei desta.
14 hrs
  -> Obrigado, ghostwriter-BR.

disagree  Mariana Hungria: I've never heard that expression before, neither has my American spouse. I suspect that this is a British English idiom. The original post was asking for an American English term.
14 hrs
  -> I heard the expression many years ago, used by an American teacher, when I learned English. Natalia (above in the discussion entries) found a good reference. Actually, the expression seems to have been British originally.

agree  Emiliano Pantoja
16 hrs
  -> Obrigado, Emiliano.
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45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
You can run but you can't hide


Explanation:
Just wonder what would be, this is my suggestion.

Might not be literal but I always hear this in thriller movies XD

Maria Stella Translator (BR-PT)
Brazil
Local time: 08:24
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
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37 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Jump from the frying pan into the fire


Explanation:
Sugestion.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 46 mins (2012-02-26 23:29:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Fugiens ursum, incidit in leonem.

ghostwriter-BR
Brazil
Local time: 08:24
Native speaker of: Portuguese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Daniel Tavares
13 hrs
  -> Obrigado, Daniel!

agree  Jorge Rodrigues: Sem desmerecer as outras respostas, também gostei desta.
13 hrs
  -> Obrigado, Jorge!
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57 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
no way out


Explanation:
Just to be short and simple.

Airton J Souza
Brazil
Local time: 08:24
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
"between a rock and a hard place"


Explanation:
It's not really the same but...it might work depending on the context

Mariana Hungria
Brazil
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Daniel Tavares: Vejam a explicação de "to be between the devil..." e de "to be between a rock..." na wikipedia. Ambas as expressões são bastante usadas em inglês e tem exatamente o mesmo sentido de "se correr o bicho pega".
13 hrs
  -> Right the idiom between a rock and a hard place is used in American English, the "between the devil" is a British term not commonly used in the USA. I think the original post asked for American English.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
catch 22 situation


Explanation:
common expression, also used very often in computer / IT contexts and I think it captures the meaning of your Brazilian PT expression

http://www.answers.com/topic/catch-22

Gilmar Fernandes
United States
Local time: 06:24
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Mariana Hungria
2 mins
  -> Muito obrigado :)

agree  Luciano Eduardo de Oliveira
7 hrs
  -> Thank You Luciano :)

agree  NataliaAnne: I think this is the best answer because, as well as capturing the meaning, it’s a common expression and isn’t overly informal.
11 hrs
  -> Very kind of you. Thanks, Natalie :)
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Damned if you do, damned if you don't.


Explanation:
Of course, this depends on the context and the target audience.

Maria Amaral
Local time: 06:24
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish
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Changes made by editors
Mar 11, 2012 - Changes made by Jorge Rodrigues:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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