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corte de bajuladores

English translation: retinue of sycophants

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Portuguese term or phrase:corte de bajuladores
English translation:retinue of sycophants
Entered by: Mary Palmer
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22:42 Feb 7, 2012
Portuguese to English translations [PRO]
Government / Politics
Portuguese term or phrase: corte de bajuladores
Hi again :) How would you translate "corte de bajuladores".

Would you say "groups of sycophants"?

Thanks again!
Mary Palmer
United States
Local time: 16:32
retinue of sycophants
Explanation:
Yes, "corte" certainly derives from absolute monarchies and the expression "to hold court" derived therof. However, trying to use logic to conclude that, since the verbal expression is in common use, so would be the related noun "court" is a slippery slope indeed (many a translation attempt has been derailed by such daring maneuvers). The word we need here is "retinue".(*)

Next, a good equivalent for "bajular" in this context is to fawn. However, we again need to refrain from the siren song of Logic (mind you, that is coming from a mathematician) and avoid the tempation to force the word "fawner". Just as a kind of "menção honrosa", if I may, the verb "to flatter" is close but not as derogatory as "bajular" in this specific context. Hence "flatterer", which is a common enough word ,turns out not to be such a good fit. On the other hand, when taken out of context, a "sycophant" is not exactly a "bajulador", but it happens to work quite well in this case.

Finally, in spite of the the definite article used in "..veio da corte de bajuladores, nacionais e estrangeiros, que acreditam...", I believe the indefinite article will flow better in English: "...came from a retinue of sycophants, domestic as well as foreign, which think...". And yes, I did consider the alternative "retinue of domestic and foreign sycophants" but concluded that it would be better not to wedge that qualifier between "retinue" and "sycophants"

-------------------------------
(*) Just for fun, it occurs to me that, were the contex American and juvenile, the word "posse" would fit. Once again, it's all about the context.
Selected response from:

coolbrowne
United States
Local time: 15:32
Grading comment
Thanks Rick and everyone else for your suggestions and comments. All answers are correct in my opinion but Rick's suggestion fits perfectly in this particular context. Thumbs up! :)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1retinue of sycophantscoolbrowne
4 +1bootlickers
Gilmar Fernandes
4court of sycophants/interestsSheryle Oliver
4(group of) hangers-on
Nick Taylor


Discussion entries: 11





  

Answers


17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
bootlickers


Explanation:
I would just use it in plural, rather that a "group of....."

"corte" alludes to a group sucking up to someone in power....maybe a president ?


From Michaelis Dictionary:
bootlicker
boot.lick.er
n sl bajulador, puxa-saco

Gilmar Fernandes
United States
Local time: 15:32
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 40

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Daniel Tavares
14 hrs
  -> Thank You Sir!
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
court of sycophants/interests


Explanation:

...court of (national and international/domestic and foreign) sycophants/ interests...

If they must breed, so be it. Take close note of the tone of the passage. Within the context (now available), the author's choice of the word /court/ implies that he/she believes that the world should have changed, but has actually changed little since the time of Alexander the Great (or Restoration drama).

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2012-02-08 02:57:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A final thought: If you prefer to tone it down, /interest groups/ would do.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2012-02-08 05:54:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Or, at 03:50, a final toner-downer: /swarm of interest groups/



Sheryle Oliver
Brazil
Local time: 17:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
(group of) hangers-on


Explanation:
hangers-on

Nick Taylor
Local time: 20:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32
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2 days1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
retinue of sycophants


Explanation:
Yes, "corte" certainly derives from absolute monarchies and the expression "to hold court" derived therof. However, trying to use logic to conclude that, since the verbal expression is in common use, so would be the related noun "court" is a slippery slope indeed (many a translation attempt has been derailed by such daring maneuvers). The word we need here is "retinue".(*)

Next, a good equivalent for "bajular" in this context is to fawn. However, we again need to refrain from the siren song of Logic (mind you, that is coming from a mathematician) and avoid the tempation to force the word "fawner". Just as a kind of "menção honrosa", if I may, the verb "to flatter" is close but not as derogatory as "bajular" in this specific context. Hence "flatterer", which is a common enough word ,turns out not to be such a good fit. On the other hand, when taken out of context, a "sycophant" is not exactly a "bajulador", but it happens to work quite well in this case.

Finally, in spite of the the definite article used in "..veio da corte de bajuladores, nacionais e estrangeiros, que acreditam...", I believe the indefinite article will flow better in English: "...came from a retinue of sycophants, domestic as well as foreign, which think...". And yes, I did consider the alternative "retinue of domestic and foreign sycophants" but concluded that it would be better not to wedge that qualifier between "retinue" and "sycophants"

-------------------------------
(*) Just for fun, it occurs to me that, were the contex American and juvenile, the word "posse" would fit. Once again, it's all about the context.

coolbrowne
United States
Local time: 15:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks Rick and everyone else for your suggestions and comments. All answers are correct in my opinion but Rick's suggestion fits perfectly in this particular context. Thumbs up! :)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sheryle Oliver: Adorei (despite my other answer - perhaps we should be writing a short story, novel...?)
5 hrs
  -> Obrigado (will take it under advisement...)
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