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friso

English translation: inlay design

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Portuguese term or phrase:friso
English translation:inlay design
Entered by: Berni Armstrong
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23:17 Jun 29, 2004
Portuguese to English translations [PRO]
Music / Part of a musical instrument
Portuguese term or phrase: friso
I am looking at Portuguese musical instruments on various websites and keep getting references to "frisos" - "Guitarra or Bandolim with two "frisos", etc.

Any translators here who are also Portuguese guitarrists or "viola" players and know what a "friso" is? It is NOT a "fillet" as translated on a certain Lisbon shop's site. I will not name them, because their translations are so apalling they begger belief! - although their instruments are fine - I have one of their "Portuguese Guitars"
Berni Armstrong
Local time: 06:53
inlay
Explanation:
It is decoration, I strongly believe. I know the names of the functional components, and none of them is called friso. A little Googling confirmed my belief. Look for (inlay guitar) and (friso violão) ... ou guitarra, tec.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 20 mins (2004-06-30 04:38:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Coming back to this item and continuing Googling, I fail to pinpoint what those music houses may be referring to. In traditional instruments inlays make sense. E.g., the rosette (pt roseta) around the mouth of a high-end classical guitar is inlay work. Inlay work with a linear aspect might be the suff of those frisos, but I am skeptical.

Through Google frisos in instruments lead me most often to electric guitars and metal elements (decoration?) That is cetainly consistent with the word friso. I can picture them frisos, but as for an en name I am drawing a blank.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 42 mins (2004-06-30 05:00:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Maybe I got it

BINDING

(still cum grano salis)

Look for (binding guitar), though it is used in electric guitars, and in other traditional instruments.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 51 mins (2004-06-30 05:09:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note: in spite of the name, bindings are commonly inlays (in the front and back of the body, where the tampos meet the ilhargas). I suspect that bindings in many electric guitars are metal \"edges\", maybe even deserving of their name.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs 1 min (2004-06-30 14:18:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Same or similar decorative edge inlay veneer, especially in violins -- or the process of putting it in place -- is also called purfling,
Selected response from:

Amilcar
Grading comment
Thanks.

Yes, it appears to be the inlay design around the soundhole (1 friso) ...and around the edge of the body of the instrument (2 frisos).
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +3inlayAmilcar
4 +1friezeRN0674
3string supportAntónio Ribeiro


  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
frieze


Explanation:
A frieze is usually "a horizontal band of sculpture", or a "band of decoration" (Oxford Dictionary).

RN0674
Local time: 00:53
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ROCHA-ROBINSON: :)
20 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
string support


Explanation:
Pleo que percebo do sítio que a seguir indico, o friso é aquela peça junto à abertura da caixa do instrumento onde as cordas assentam. Daí, a minha sugestão.

Ver:

Museus na Escola -
... tem sete cordas simples e já está muito próximo formalmente da viola romântica
do ... do instrumento é dourada sobre estuque e rematada por um friso de metal. ...
museusnaescola.eselx.ipl.pt/static/ instance/Museu_da_Musica/propostas/actividades1.html

António Ribeiro
Local time: 14:53
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Amilcar: Info: o nome dessa peça em inglês é bridge nos vários instrumentos de corda. Em pt: "cavalete" ou "ponte"
54 mins
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52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
inlay


Explanation:
It is decoration, I strongly believe. I know the names of the functional components, and none of them is called friso. A little Googling confirmed my belief. Look for (inlay guitar) and (friso violão) ... ou guitarra, tec.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 20 mins (2004-06-30 04:38:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Coming back to this item and continuing Googling, I fail to pinpoint what those music houses may be referring to. In traditional instruments inlays make sense. E.g., the rosette (pt roseta) around the mouth of a high-end classical guitar is inlay work. Inlay work with a linear aspect might be the suff of those frisos, but I am skeptical.

Through Google frisos in instruments lead me most often to electric guitars and metal elements (decoration?) That is cetainly consistent with the word friso. I can picture them frisos, but as for an en name I am drawing a blank.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 42 mins (2004-06-30 05:00:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Maybe I got it

BINDING

(still cum grano salis)

Look for (binding guitar), though it is used in electric guitars, and in other traditional instruments.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 51 mins (2004-06-30 05:09:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note: in spite of the name, bindings are commonly inlays (in the front and back of the body, where the tampos meet the ilhargas). I suspect that bindings in many electric guitars are metal \"edges\", maybe even deserving of their name.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs 1 min (2004-06-30 14:18:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Same or similar decorative edge inlay veneer, especially in violins -- or the process of putting it in place -- is also called purfling,

Amilcar
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks.

Yes, it appears to be the inlay design around the soundhole (1 friso) ...and around the edge of the body of the instrument (2 frisos).

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ROCHA-ROBINSON: inlay also good - decorative inlay on guitar front/back..:)
1 hr
  -> Obrigado

agree  Sormane Fitzgerald Gomes
1 hr
  -> Obrigado

agree  Henrique Magalhaes
8 hrs
  -> Obrigado
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