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intertextualidade

English translation: intertextuality

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Portuguese term or phrase:intertextualidade
English translation:intertextuality
Entered by: Brigitte Gendebien
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06:03 Apr 24, 2001
Portuguese to English translations [Non-PRO]
Science
Portuguese term or phrase: intertextualidade
This word belongs to a Brazilian high school's program of Portuguese Language.
Thanks.
Fernanda Silva Mendes
intertextuality
Explanation:
intertextuality
Although Saussure stressed the importance of the relationship of signs to each other, one of the weaknesses of structuralist semiotics is the tendency to treat individual texts as discrete, closed-off entities and to focus exclusively on internal structures. Even where texts are studied as a 'corpus' (a unified collection), the overall generic structures tend themselves to be treated as strictly bounded. The structuralist's first analytical task is often described as being to delimit the boundaries of the system (what is to be included and what excluded), which is logistically understandable but ontologically problematic. Even remaining within the structuralist paradigm, we may note that codes transcend structures. The semiotic notion of intertextuality introduced by Julia Kristeva is associated primarily with poststructuralist theorists. Kristeva referred to texts in terms of two axes: a horizontal axis connecting the author and reader of a text, and a vertical axis, which connects the text to other texts (Kristeva 1980, 69). Uniting these two axes are shared codes: every text and every reading depends on prior codes. Kristeva declared that 'every text is from the outset under the jurisdiction of other discourses which impose a universe on it' (cited in Culler 1981, 105). She argued that rather than confining our attention to the structure of a text we should study its 'structuration' (how the structure came into being). This involved siting it 'within the totality of previous or synchronic texts' of which it was a 'transformation' (Le texte du roman, cited by Coward & Ellis 1977, 52). [...]
http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Documents/S4B/sem09.html

Intertextuality is most widely used as a term in literature. It is evident in virtually all texts in some way or another.
Through intertextuality, writers can draw inspiration from other writers before them, interpreting their ideas in a new and unique way and in turn producing entirely different works
(http://mdcm.students.arts.unsw.edu.au/Glossary/Intertextuali...

Intertextuality: The semiotic notion of intertextuality introduced by Kristeva is associated primarily with poststructuralist theorists. Intertextuality refers to the various links in form and content which bind a text to other texts. Each text exists in relation to others. Although the debts of a text to other texts are seldom acknowledged, texts owe more to other texts than to their own makers. Texts provide contexts such as genre within which other texts may be created and interpreted. The notion of intertextuality problematizes the idea of a text having boundaries: where does a text begin and end? See also: Bricolage, Genre, Intratextuality, Postmodernism, Reflexivity (http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Documents/S4B/sem-gloss.html#int...



Selected response from:

Brigitte Gendebien
Belgium
Local time: 06:04
Grading comment
Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!
Brazilian Regards
FSM
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
naintertextuality
Brigitte Gendebien


  

Answers


47 mins
intertextuality


Explanation:
intertextuality
Although Saussure stressed the importance of the relationship of signs to each other, one of the weaknesses of structuralist semiotics is the tendency to treat individual texts as discrete, closed-off entities and to focus exclusively on internal structures. Even where texts are studied as a 'corpus' (a unified collection), the overall generic structures tend themselves to be treated as strictly bounded. The structuralist's first analytical task is often described as being to delimit the boundaries of the system (what is to be included and what excluded), which is logistically understandable but ontologically problematic. Even remaining within the structuralist paradigm, we may note that codes transcend structures. The semiotic notion of intertextuality introduced by Julia Kristeva is associated primarily with poststructuralist theorists. Kristeva referred to texts in terms of two axes: a horizontal axis connecting the author and reader of a text, and a vertical axis, which connects the text to other texts (Kristeva 1980, 69). Uniting these two axes are shared codes: every text and every reading depends on prior codes. Kristeva declared that 'every text is from the outset under the jurisdiction of other discourses which impose a universe on it' (cited in Culler 1981, 105). She argued that rather than confining our attention to the structure of a text we should study its 'structuration' (how the structure came into being). This involved siting it 'within the totality of previous or synchronic texts' of which it was a 'transformation' (Le texte du roman, cited by Coward & Ellis 1977, 52). [...]
http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Documents/S4B/sem09.html

Intertextuality is most widely used as a term in literature. It is evident in virtually all texts in some way or another.
Through intertextuality, writers can draw inspiration from other writers before them, interpreting their ideas in a new and unique way and in turn producing entirely different works
(http://mdcm.students.arts.unsw.edu.au/Glossary/Intertextuali...

Intertextuality: The semiotic notion of intertextuality introduced by Kristeva is associated primarily with poststructuralist theorists. Intertextuality refers to the various links in form and content which bind a text to other texts. Each text exists in relation to others. Although the debts of a text to other texts are seldom acknowledged, texts owe more to other texts than to their own makers. Texts provide contexts such as genre within which other texts may be created and interpreted. The notion of intertextuality problematizes the idea of a text having boundaries: where does a text begin and end? See also: Bricolage, Genre, Intratextuality, Postmodernism, Reflexivity (http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Documents/S4B/sem-gloss.html#int...





Brigitte Gendebien
Belgium
Local time: 06:04
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
Grading comment
Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!
Brazilian Regards
FSM

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
xxxJon Zuber
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