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Ursul se pune in traista gospodarului cand pleaca la drum.

English translation: A wiseman should take food supplies with him when leaving on a journey.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Romanian term or phrase:Ursul se pune in traista gospodarului cand pleaca la drum.
English translation:A wiseman should take food supplies with him when leaving on a journey.
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21:36 Dec 2, 2003
Romanian to English translations [Non-PRO]
Linguistics / Linguistics
Romanian term or phrase: Ursul se pune in traista gospodarului cand pleaca la drum.
This appears to be a proverb in Romanian. I was wondering what its English meaning is? "Traista" means 'bag' or 'sack' according to the dictionary. "Gospodar" might be 'landlord'. Still the meaning is hard to unravel (or translate) into English. Any help is greatly appreciated.
Sincerely,
Brian Costello
Seattle, Wa.
Brian Costello
A wise man should take food supplies with him when leaving on a journey
Explanation:
The fact is that my colleague is right about that word. "Urs" normally means "bear" like you said, but it also has a regional meaning. It is the name of a traditional food made of corn mush (or "hominy", or "polenta") mixed with cheese.

URS ursi m.
1) Mamifer omnivor, ...
2) fig. Om greoi ...
3) reg. Bot de mămăligă cu brânză în mijloc; cocolos; bulz. /<lat. ursus

Of course I cannot argue with you when you say "hominy" is an American food, but that doesn't mean something similar doesn't exist in Romania. The translator simply chose the closest word in meaning.

Now, what I don't agree with is the translation "householder". Gospodar has at least two meanings and here it should be translated by "worthy man", "wise man" or simply "man".

Your sentence is indeed a proverb and I tried at least to offer you the meaning of it.

I hope it helps.
Selected response from:

Dan Marasescu
Romania
Local time: 10:39
Grading comment
Dear Dan,
Thank you for your response. This one was a little more difficult than I originally thought and needed more explanation than a usual sentence. But you provided it. Thanks again! (Come to think of it, I occasionally hear metaphors and proverbs in English that are not too clear to me even though I am an English speaker. For example I've never really understood the meaning of "Tell that to the Marines!" just to mention one).

Sincerely,
Brian Costello
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5The hominy(corn mush) is always in the householder's bag when he travels.
Paula Cirstoiu
5The hominy(corn mush) is always in the householder's bag when he travels.
Paula Cirstoiu
5Dear BrianSerge L
4A wise man should take food supplies with him when leaving on a journey
Dan Marasescu


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Dear Brian


Explanation:
I think it would be great if you'd tell us something about the purpose of your questions.

I noticed that you have been asking questions in various language pairs...

English > Romanian
http://www.proz.com/?sp=h&id=584581

German > English
http://www.proz.com/?sp=h&id=582824&keyword=ich bin eine

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/583870

English> Italian:
http://www.proz.com/glossary/583855

I also remember questions in Spanish and Portugese and some other languages, but I can't find them right now...

Thanks for your explanation

Serge L.



Serge L
Local time: 10:39
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
The hominy(corn mush) is always in the householder's bag when he travels.


Explanation:
"Urs" usually means "bear" in English, but in this case we are dealing with a regional word(urs = hominy, corn mush).
The hominy(corn mush) is a traditional Romanian food. A householder always takes something to eat just to be sure everything is set up for the journey.

Paula Cirstoiu
Local time: 11:39
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
The hominy(corn mush) is always in the householder's bag when he travels.


Explanation:
"Urs" usually means "bear" in English, but in this case we are dealing with a regional word(urs = hominy, corn mush).
The hominy(corn mush) is a traditional Romanian food. A householder always takes something to eat just to be sure everything is set up for the journey.

Paula Cirstoiu
Local time: 11:39
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
Grading comment
Questionable - Hominy is not a Romanian food. Urs is "bear"
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The asker has declined this answer
Comment: Questionable - Hominy is not a Romanian food. Urs is "bear"

11 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
A wise man should take food supplies with him when leaving on a journey


Explanation:
The fact is that my colleague is right about that word. "Urs" normally means "bear" like you said, but it also has a regional meaning. It is the name of a traditional food made of corn mush (or "hominy", or "polenta") mixed with cheese.

URS ursi m.
1) Mamifer omnivor, ...
2) fig. Om greoi ...
3) reg. Bot de mămăligă cu brânză în mijloc; cocolos; bulz. /<lat. ursus

Of course I cannot argue with you when you say "hominy" is an American food, but that doesn't mean something similar doesn't exist in Romania. The translator simply chose the closest word in meaning.

Now, what I don't agree with is the translation "householder". Gospodar has at least two meanings and here it should be translated by "worthy man", "wise man" or simply "man".

Your sentence is indeed a proverb and I tried at least to offer you the meaning of it.

I hope it helps.

Dan Marasescu
Romania
Local time: 10:39
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian
Grading comment
Dear Dan,
Thank you for your response. This one was a little more difficult than I originally thought and needed more explanation than a usual sentence. But you provided it. Thanks again! (Come to think of it, I occasionally hear metaphors and proverbs in English that are not too clear to me even though I am an English speaker. For example I've never really understood the meaning of "Tell that to the Marines!" just to mention one).

Sincerely,
Brian Costello
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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