вырашивать скот.

English translation: to raise cattle/poultry

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Russian term or phrase:вырашивать скот/птицу
English translation:to raise cattle/poultry
Entered by: Robert Donahue (X)

14:01 Apr 24, 2005
Russian to English translations [PRO]
Livestock / Animal Husbandry
Russian term or phrase: вырашивать скот.
вырашивать скот. выращивать птицу
я согласно словарей пишу что на мясо the cattle and hens are reared. But from the link provided amicably with mr Lukaikin I start to realise that some chicken are raised.

As I usually see these things already on my plate is it possible to get some advice from a real pro whether I am right rearing chicken in my translation of they must be raised?
Sergei Tumanov
Local time: 00:44
raise chickens
Explanation:
To "raise chickens" is far more common (and natural sounding) than "rearing chickens".

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Note added at 7 mins (2005-04-24 14:08:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Raise chickens\" 22,000 hits.
\"rear chickens\" 466
\"raising chickens\" 53,400
\"rearing chickens\" 784
\"raising children\" 1,030,000
\"rearing children\" 37,900
\"raising cattle\" 40,300
\"rearing cattle\" 865

google hits

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Note added at 18 mins (2005-04-24 14:20:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

RAISE 8.a. To grow, especially in quantity; cultivate: raise corn and soybeans. b. To breed and care for to maturity: raise cattle. c. To bring up; rear: raise children.

REAR v. reared, rear·ing, rears. --tr. 1. To care for (children or a child) during the early stages of life; bring up. 2. To lift upright; raise. 3. To build; erect. See Synonyms at lift. 4. To tend (growing plants or animals).
Selected response from:

Robert Donahue (X)
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Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +13raise chickens
Robert Donahue (X)
4 +2Well, the only thing I can testify to...
Drunya
4breed
ruslingua
4I would write "raise" (о животных)
Andrej
3 +1raise livestock
Crio


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
вырашивать скот.
I would write "raise" (о животных)


Explanation:
I would write "raise" (о животных)

Andrej
Local time: 00:44
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
вырашивать скот.
Well, the only thing I can testify to...


Explanation:
...is that "rearing poultry" is quite all right and is used in the literature. To illustrate the point, I'll quote a passage from Measuring and Auditing Broiler Welfare by Claire Weeks (Cambridge, MA, USA, 2004, p 258-9) (here the chickens are both "raised" and "reared"):

====================
Small-scale Poultry Rearing

Whilst industrial-style farming is behind the phenomenal surge in poultry production worldwide, the raising of small flocks of chickens still plays a key role in the survival of many farmers in the developing world. Some 80% of farmers in Asia and Africa raise small flocks of chickens (Garces, 2002). Small, community-level farms are often important in maintaining rural livelihoods and local food security. As industrial chicken-rearing methods are adopted around the world, the animal welfare concerns are typically replicated. Fast-growing genetic strains of bird, with their attendant propensity to poor leg health and cardiovascular problems, are usually reared in large numbers at high stocking densities. These technically sophisticated, low-labour techniques can also threaten rural livelihoods and local food security. In East and South-east Asia, for example, industrial agriculture has been increasing, with greater use of machinery, chemical fertilizer and financial services, such as foreign loans. There has been a consequent shift from small-scale rearing of ruminant animals to the industrial production of pigs and poultry. As developing countries adopt mechanized livestock rearing, there is a parallel shift away from self-sufficiency towards a dependency on imports. Local food security can be threatened as a result. As Garces (2002) puts it,
Grains, tractors, oil to fuel the tractors, fertilizers and special animal units and processors are all needed for intensive livestock rearing, none of which a developing country starts out by making itself. Asia now imports large amounts of grain to feed its factory-farmed animals.

It is tempting to believe that intensive farming needs less land to produce food for humans and animals. Yet intensive chicken production requires plentiful supplies of grain to feed to the birds. The result is that crop farming often becomes intensive, involving the use of large amounts of chemicals, such as fertilizers,
herbicides, insecticides and fungicides. This has been linked to the loss of soil fertility and farmland wildlife. In the Philippines, for example, a serious consequence of the rise in intensive animal production has been the diversion of imported grain for human consumption to feed farm animals rather than people. A recent report on livestock development published by the World Bank comments that the ‘shift to more grain-based production could seriously affect global and national food security’ (de Haan et al., 2001).
==========

Drunya
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Robert Donahue (X): You're correct in that it can be (and has been) used. The only point that I am trying to make is that it is not as common and sounds a little "off". I used to spend my summers on the farm. We hatched chicks and then "raised" them to maturity.
8 mins
  -> You are right, it may sound a bit off. In textbooks they usually rear livestock, though Google would much sooner raise it than rear it. But I am a city boy, so I guess I'll just have to trust you on that one :-)

agree  Irene Chernenko: I think "rearing" is used when trying to avoid the idea that they will eventually be eaten!
27 mins
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +13
вырашивать скот.
raise chickens


Explanation:
To "raise chickens" is far more common (and natural sounding) than "rearing chickens".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 mins (2005-04-24 14:08:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Raise chickens\" 22,000 hits.
\"rear chickens\" 466
\"raising chickens\" 53,400
\"rearing chickens\" 784
\"raising children\" 1,030,000
\"rearing children\" 37,900
\"raising cattle\" 40,300
\"rearing cattle\" 865

google hits

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 mins (2005-04-24 14:20:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

RAISE 8.a. To grow, especially in quantity; cultivate: raise corn and soybeans. b. To breed and care for to maturity: raise cattle. c. To bring up; rear: raise children.

REAR v. reared, rear·ing, rears. --tr. 1. To care for (children or a child) during the early stages of life; bring up. 2. To lift upright; raise. 3. To build; erect. See Synonyms at lift. 4. To tend (growing plants or animals).


    Reference: http://www.motherearthnews.com/library/2003_Febuary_March/Ho...
Robert Donahue (X)
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Andrey Belousov (X)
0 min
  -> Thanks Andrey

agree  Larissa Dinsley
2 mins
  -> Thanks Larissa

agree  sokolniki
9 mins
  -> Thanks Izabella

agree  Konstantin Kisin: lol, children :)
17 mins
  -> ; ) Thanks Konstantin

agree  Michael Moskowitz
18 mins
  -> Thank you Michael

agree  Irene Chernenko: I guess you could "rear" cows or chickens as pets, otherwise "raise". :)
35 mins
  -> I like your comment above : ) We're talking livestock here, so they are eventually going to be eaten. Although that logic makes me a little queasy since I got a million hits for "raising children"! : P

agree  Kurt Porter
43 mins
  -> Thanks Kurt

agree  Dorene Cornwell: Sure, except the text is general, so I would say "raise poultry." They might be raising turkeys, geese or other fowl too.
1 hr
  -> Thanks Dorene. Good point. It does depend on context. "Raise poultry" has a higher register than "raise chickens".

agree  protolmach
1 hr
  -> Thanks Protolmach

agree  Jack Doughty: with Dorene.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Jack

agree  Jack slep: yeah, I used to "raise" them years ago!
9 hrs
  -> Thanks Jack

agree  Aleksey Khudyakov
6 days
  -> Thanks Aleksey

agree  gtreyger (X)
9 days
  -> Thanks Gennadiy
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34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
вырашивать скот.
raise livestock


Explanation:
напишите "raise livestock", будет вам сразу и скот, и птица.

(т.е. если оплата за слова источника =)

Crio
Russian Federation
Local time: 00:44
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Irene Chernenko: I'm not sure chickens are referred to as "livestock"?
7 mins
  -> sure (well, usually) they are. Take a look at Yahoo directory, e.g., http://dir.yahoo.com/Business_and_Economy/Business_to_Busine...

agree  Clive Wilshin: This is the correct version for American English. British English prefers "raise cattle."
2 hrs
  -> thanks, I was not aware of this.

neutral  Robert Donahue (X): We use the word "cattle" in the US too Clive and quite often. The question at hand is not whether to use the term cattle or livestock or domestic animals, it's whether or not to use "raise" or "rear" in relation to them (it's been said twice before this)
21 hrs
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
вырашивать скот.
breed


Explanation:

Webster's New World Dictionary & Thesaurus:

"breed":
1 to bring forth (offspring) from the womb or hatch (young) from the egg

Key word: EGG!

Cf.

"raise":
14 a) to cause to grow or to breed !to raise corn or cattle" b) to bring up or rear (children)


"rear":
3 to grow or breed (animals or plants)
4 to bring up by educating, nurturing, training, etc.; raise !to rear a child"

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Note added at 1 day 7 hrs 16 mins (2005-04-25 21:18:03 GMT)
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s far as I understand, you interpret \"breeding, raising and caring for\" livestock either as consecutive steps of processing an egg (a symbol of perfection for some) to a Kentucky Fried Chicken input, or as functions aimed at the same God-inspired result.

I can\'t see any evidence in support of the first suggestion. Only one example: if you want \"breeding/raising\" be efficient, you are supposed to \"care for\" the animals all the time. You also can shirk, and the chicken can still become a valuable part of our society, but this is not the normal course of business, and you run the risk that when the livestock raises, it rises against you (see Animal Farm for details).

You also do not suggest any clear distinction between \"breeding\" and \"raising\" as stages of animal farming. Does such distinction exist?

\"breeding\" and \"raising\" do not work as separate functions, either, according to Wikipedia you refer to. Just have a look at the fist picture: \"Sheep are commonly bred as livestock\". The sheep looks absolutely happy and doesn\'t seem to be willing any additional \"raising\" to complement their \"breeding\". And who can be a better expert than the sheep?

Also, the sentence \"The raising of livestock can be traced to the beginnings of human civilisation, when instead of hunting wild animals, humans began to capture animals for breeding.\" doesn\'t seemt to support the idea that \"breeding\" and \"raising\" are alternatives/complements. Rather (my guess not supported by any internevidence), \"raising\" is closer to colloqial, while \"breeding\", to science/formal speech.


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Note added at 1 day 7 hrs 36 mins (2005-04-25 21:37:49 GMT)
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Troubleshooting:
- A(s far as...)
- The sheep look absolutely happy and don\'t seem to...

ruslingua
Local time: 00:44
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Robert Donahue (X): That is definitely one of the more interesting arguments for an answer that I've seen on here in some time. I am going to choose (respectfully) to agree to disagree.
17 hrs
  -> Thank you for the deep insight in the animal life. But even if you were right, it were the process, of which "raising" also appeared to only be "a part", though, wouldn't it? Still, I think your interpretation is misleading (s. above)
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