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serebryannye denari, sestercii, zolotye solidy...

Dutch translation: denarius, sestertius, solidus (lat.)

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06:41 Apr 18, 2001
Russian to Dutch translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial
Russian term or phrase: serebryannye denari, sestercii, zolotye solidy...
serebryannye denari, sestercii, zolotye solidy...

Dit zijn de namen van verschillende munten. Ik vraag me eigenlijk af hoe ze in het enkelvoud worden vertaald. Kunt u me helpen?

Dank u!
Nathalya
Belgium
Local time: 09:32
Dutch translation:denarius, sestertius, solidus (lat.)
Explanation:




Names of Roman coins.

Pluiral:

denarii, sestertii, solidi

Value:

1 Aureus = 25 Denarii
1 Denarius = 4 Sestertii = 8 Dupondii = 16 Asses = 64 Quadrans

Aureus ( Denarius Aureus) - golden coin later replaced by solidus.


Britannica:

Introduction of the denarius

Adjustment of the previously fluctuating relationship between bronze and silver was first secured by the issue c. 211 BC of the silver denarius (marked X--i.e., 10 bronze asses), together with fractional coins, also of silver (marked V--i.e., five; and IIS--i.e., 2 1/2 asses--a sesterce, or sestertius). The denarii were lighter than the quadrigati; their types were a Roma head on the obverse, with the Dioscuri (the twin deities Castor and Pollux) and ROMA on the reverse. Their production came to be confined principally to the mint of Rome. The victoriates, again lighter (their weight standard had come from Illyria), were issued until c. 150 BC, being perhaps intended for principal circulation outside Italy. The denarius, however, quickly established itself as the major currency in the central and western Mediterranean. In its eastward expansion, Rome learned to make use of local currencies--gold staters of Macedonia and silver tetradrachms of Athens or Asia. Rome was also prepared to employ Macedonian gold in the west, as was shown by the release to western markets of large quantities of gold staters after c. 150 BC. In the 2nd century BC, Roman coinage in gold was exceptional. Coinage in bronze, however, continued, but further variation in silver-bronze values was seen in two developments. The as dropped in weight to that of an uncia and then less, becoming a token currency; together with its fractions, it was now always struck and not cast. The value of the denarius in terms of bronze was altered, being revalued c. 133 at 16 instead of 10 asses; the silver quinarius (now of eight asses and with the types of the victoriate) became rare; and the silver sesterce (now equal to four asses) virtually disappeared. After c. 80 BC the striking of bronze was discontinued until the time of Caesar.

These developments mirrored the economic difficulties of the day. Reduction of the weight of the as from one to 1/2 ounce in 89 BC was accompanied temporarily by debasement of the denarius, resulting in the issue of denarii with serrated edges, intended to show that they were not plated.

The collection of coins of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, Polish Kingdom of 16th - 18th centuries is presented by denariuses, ternariuses, solids, mites, orts, thalers and others.
natlib.org.by/Web/Hist_Cult_Museum/eng/numismat.htm.

Aureus -- plural: aurei. The standard gold coin of the Empire. Aureus is actually an adjective meaning golden (the noun for gold is aurum), but came to be used as a noun when referring to this coin. During the Republic, gold coins were struck only to make paying large debts more convenient. It was Julius Caesar who gave the aureus a fixed weight and introduced it into common circulation.

The aureus was over 99% pure gold and weighed about 8 grams. As is the case with most Roman coins, the aureus suffered debasement, particularly under Nero (yes, that was real gold that gilded his Domus Aureus). When Nero became emperor, the aureus weighed about 7.7g; by the time he was done it sank to 7.2g. The aureus suffered more debasement and devaluation until 309 when Constantine replaced it with the solidus.

www.iei.net/~tryan/coins.htm

Het Romeinse Muntstelsel


Bron: Princeton Economic Institute
Rond het begin van de jaartelling voerde Keizer Augustus een nieuw muntstelsel in. Met de zilveren denarius (een dagloon) betaalde hij zijn legioenen. Van de denarii van Keizer Augustus zijn meer dan honderd varianten bekend. Zijn opvolger Tiberius heeft slecht twee typen laten slaan.

Overzicht
Aureus (goud) = 25 zilveren denarii
Quinarius (goud) = 12 zilveren denarii
Denarius (zilver 3,1 gram) = 16 koperen assen
Quinarius (zilver) = 8 koperen assen
Sestertius (orichalcum) = 4 koperen assen
Dupondius (orichalcum) = 2 koperen assen
As (koper) - 4 koperen quadranten
Semis (orichalcum) = 2 koperen quadranten
Quadrans (koper) = 1 koperen as
www.goliath.nl/bijbel/nieuws/munten/jezus.html.
Selected response from:

Davorka Grgic
Local time: 09:32
Grading comment
Thank you very much!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
nadenarius, sestertius, solidus (lat.)
Davorka Grgic


  

Answers


45 mins
denarius, sestertius, solidus (lat.)


Explanation:




Names of Roman coins.

Pluiral:

denarii, sestertii, solidi

Value:

1 Aureus = 25 Denarii
1 Denarius = 4 Sestertii = 8 Dupondii = 16 Asses = 64 Quadrans

Aureus ( Denarius Aureus) - golden coin later replaced by solidus.


Britannica:

Introduction of the denarius

Adjustment of the previously fluctuating relationship between bronze and silver was first secured by the issue c. 211 BC of the silver denarius (marked X--i.e., 10 bronze asses), together with fractional coins, also of silver (marked V--i.e., five; and IIS--i.e., 2 1/2 asses--a sesterce, or sestertius). The denarii were lighter than the quadrigati; their types were a Roma head on the obverse, with the Dioscuri (the twin deities Castor and Pollux) and ROMA on the reverse. Their production came to be confined principally to the mint of Rome. The victoriates, again lighter (their weight standard had come from Illyria), were issued until c. 150 BC, being perhaps intended for principal circulation outside Italy. The denarius, however, quickly established itself as the major currency in the central and western Mediterranean. In its eastward expansion, Rome learned to make use of local currencies--gold staters of Macedonia and silver tetradrachms of Athens or Asia. Rome was also prepared to employ Macedonian gold in the west, as was shown by the release to western markets of large quantities of gold staters after c. 150 BC. In the 2nd century BC, Roman coinage in gold was exceptional. Coinage in bronze, however, continued, but further variation in silver-bronze values was seen in two developments. The as dropped in weight to that of an uncia and then less, becoming a token currency; together with its fractions, it was now always struck and not cast. The value of the denarius in terms of bronze was altered, being revalued c. 133 at 16 instead of 10 asses; the silver quinarius (now of eight asses and with the types of the victoriate) became rare; and the silver sesterce (now equal to four asses) virtually disappeared. After c. 80 BC the striking of bronze was discontinued until the time of Caesar.

These developments mirrored the economic difficulties of the day. Reduction of the weight of the as from one to 1/2 ounce in 89 BC was accompanied temporarily by debasement of the denarius, resulting in the issue of denarii with serrated edges, intended to show that they were not plated.

The collection of coins of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, Polish Kingdom of 16th - 18th centuries is presented by denariuses, ternariuses, solids, mites, orts, thalers and others.
natlib.org.by/Web/Hist_Cult_Museum/eng/numismat.htm.

Aureus -- plural: aurei. The standard gold coin of the Empire. Aureus is actually an adjective meaning golden (the noun for gold is aurum), but came to be used as a noun when referring to this coin. During the Republic, gold coins were struck only to make paying large debts more convenient. It was Julius Caesar who gave the aureus a fixed weight and introduced it into common circulation.

The aureus was over 99% pure gold and weighed about 8 grams. As is the case with most Roman coins, the aureus suffered debasement, particularly under Nero (yes, that was real gold that gilded his Domus Aureus). When Nero became emperor, the aureus weighed about 7.7g; by the time he was done it sank to 7.2g. The aureus suffered more debasement and devaluation until 309 when Constantine replaced it with the solidus.

www.iei.net/~tryan/coins.htm

Het Romeinse Muntstelsel


Bron: Princeton Economic Institute
Rond het begin van de jaartelling voerde Keizer Augustus een nieuw muntstelsel in. Met de zilveren denarius (een dagloon) betaalde hij zijn legioenen. Van de denarii van Keizer Augustus zijn meer dan honderd varianten bekend. Zijn opvolger Tiberius heeft slecht twee typen laten slaan.

Overzicht
Aureus (goud) = 25 zilveren denarii
Quinarius (goud) = 12 zilveren denarii
Denarius (zilver 3,1 gram) = 16 koperen assen
Quinarius (zilver) = 8 koperen assen
Sestertius (orichalcum) = 4 koperen assen
Dupondius (orichalcum) = 2 koperen assen
As (koper) - 4 koperen quadranten
Semis (orichalcum) = 2 koperen quadranten
Quadrans (koper) = 1 koperen as
www.goliath.nl/bijbel/nieuws/munten/jezus.html.



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Davorka Grgic
Local time: 09:32
Native speaker of: Native in CroatianCroatian, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 70
Grading comment
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