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Nazvalsya gruzdyom - polezai v kuzov

English translation: In for a penny, in for a pound.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Russian term or phrase:Nazvalsya gruzdyom - polezai v kuzov
English translation:In for a penny, in for a pound.
Entered by: Alexander Kudriavtsev
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03:09 Dec 11, 2001
Russian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
Russian term or phrase: Nazvalsya gruzdyom - polezai v kuzov
I know there is an English equivalent, but my mind just refuses to yield one. Can someone help?
Emil Tubinshlak
Canada
Local time: 11:39
In for a penny, in for a pound.
Explanation:
Mertvago's Comparative R-E Dictionary of Russian Proverbs and Sayings offers this, as well as "Don't say go, but gaw." (which I, frankly, have never heard.

Selected response from:

Alex Lane
Local time: 09:39
Grading comment
Thanks, Alex
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +1In for a penny, in for a pound.
Alex Lane
5If you pledge, don't hedge.
Alex Lane
4You can't back out now that you've begun.evm
4fish or cut baitbeserg
3In for a penny, in for a pound OR In for a lamb, in for a sheep.
3In for a penny, in for a pound OR In for a lamb, in for a sheep.
3In for a penny, in for a pound OR In for a lamb, in for a sheep.


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
If you pledge, don't hedge.


Explanation:
According to the Random House R-E Dictionary of Idioms (Lubensky).

The saying means that if you commit to do something, don't complain it is too difficult or try to back out.

Other alternatives offered by Lubensky:

In for a penny, in or a pound.

If a job is once begun, never leave till it's done.

Cheers...

Alex Lane
Local time: 09:39
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 75
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
In for a penny, in for a pound.


Explanation:
Mertvago's Comparative R-E Dictionary of Russian Proverbs and Sayings offers this, as well as "Don't say go, but gaw." (which I, frankly, have never heard.



Alex Lane
Local time: 09:39
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 75
Grading comment
Thanks, Alex

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alexander Kudriavtsev
2 hrs
  -> Thanks.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
fish or cut bait


Explanation:
not the best equivalent but widely used when one needs to say "either do something or get out of the way"

beserg
Local time: 19:39
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 58
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
You can't back out now that you've begun.


Explanation:
Russian-English Dictionary edited by R.C.Daglish, M.A.Cantab
Russky Yazyk Publishers, Moscow 1993

evm
PRO pts in pair: 8
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
In for a penny, in for a pound OR In for a lamb, in for a sheep.


Explanation:
According to the Dictionary of English Proverbs in Modern Use (ISBN 5-200-00855-7) there are the following versions corresponding to that Russian proverb:
In for a penny, in for a pound
In for a lamb, in for a sheep OR As well be hanged for a sheep as for a lamb.
Here some of the examples from the English literature presented in the same source:
Now, gentleman, I am not a man who does things by halves. Being in for a penny, I am ready as the saying is, to be in for a pound. You must do with me what you please, and take me where you please. (Dickens)
There was a feeling of gaiety in the air, and the people, who poured past them, one way and another seemed filled with a pleasant elation. In for a penny, in for a pound, he said to himself. "Look here, would you like to come and have a bit of supper with me somewhere?" (Maugham)
I have to admit that the meaning of the expression is somewhat unclear in these examples.
Good luck.



    A Dictionary of English Proverbs in Modern Use

Native speaker of:

12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
In for a penny, in for a pound OR In for a lamb, in for a sheep.


Explanation:
According to the Dictionary of English Proverbs in Modern Use (ISBN 5-200-00855-7) there are the following versions corresponding to that Russian proverb:
In for a penny, in for a pound
In for a lamb, in for a sheep OR As well be hanged for a sheep as for a lamb.
Here some of the examples from the English literature presented in the same source:
Now, gentleman, I am not a man who does things by halves. Being in for a penny, I am ready as the saying is, to be in for a pound. You must do with me what you please, and take me where you please. (Dickens)
There was a feeling of gaiety in the air, and the people, who poured past them, one way and another seemed filled with a pleasant elation. In for a penny, in for a pound, he said to himself. "Look here, would you like to come and have a bit of supper with me somewhere?" (Maugham)
I have to admit that the meaning of the expression is somewhat unclear in these examples.
Good luck.



    A Dictionary of English Proverbs in Modern Use

Native speaker of:

12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
In for a penny, in for a pound OR In for a lamb, in for a sheep.


Explanation:
According to the Dictionary of English Proverbs in Modern Use (ISBN 5-200-00855-7) there are the following versions corresponding to that Russian proverb:
In for a penny, in for a pound
In for a lamb, in for a sheep OR As well be hanged for a sheep as for a lamb.
Here some of the examples from the English literature presented in the same source:
Now, gentleman, I am not a man who does things by halves. Being in for a penny, I am ready as the saying is, to be in for a pound. You must do with me what you please, and take me where you please. (Dickens)
There was a feeling of gaiety in the air, and the people, who poured past them, one way and another seemed filled with a pleasant elation. In for a penny, in for a pound, he said to himself. "Look here, would you like to come and have a bit of supper with me somewhere?" (Maugham)
I have to admit that the meaning of the expression is somewhat unclear in these examples.
Good luck.



    A Dictionary of English Proverbs in Modern Use

Native speaker of:




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