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уважаемая госпожа

English translation: Dear Miss "first name/last name"

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13:21 Feb 24, 2006
Russian to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
Russian term or phrase: уважаемая госпожа
It is common practice now in Ukraine to adress men and women as *госпожа/господин + first name only w/o family name:
f.ex. госпожа Мария, господин Иван
It is considered as polite form of address regardless age, marital and social status.

What is the way to translate such expressions into English in the letter?

Уважаемая госпожа Мария!
....
Мы надеемся, что вы передадите эту информацию *уважаемой госпоже Джоан*.
...
Мы также благодарны за помощь *госпоже Элизабет*.
Nataly Palamarets
Ukraine
Local time: 23:49
English translation:Dear Miss "first name/last name"
Explanation:
It's not going to work that way in American English. You should not use honorifics "esteemed" or "honorable" and then someone's first name.

If I were translating this letter, I'd use the first and last names...then go with Ms. for a woman and Mr. for a man. I would not use that combination in a letter with first name only.
Selected response from:

Kurt Porter
Local time: 01:49
Grading comment
Thank you very much, Kevin!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3Dear Miss "first name/last name"
Kurt Porter
1 +1not for grading
Jack Doughty


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Dear Miss "first name/last name"


Explanation:
It's not going to work that way in American English. You should not use honorifics "esteemed" or "honorable" and then someone's first name.

If I were translating this letter, I'd use the first and last names...then go with Ms. for a woman and Mr. for a man. I would not use that combination in a letter with first name only.

Kurt Porter
Local time: 01:49
Meets criteria
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 42
Grading comment
Thank you very much, Kevin!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jack Doughty
45 mins
  -> Thank you, Jack. My children have to call Kevin Kelly "Mr. Kevin," but that's not the same as putting it in a letter. :) :)

agree  Mikhail Kropotov: Hardly a pro question but good job anyway!
1 hr
  -> Misha, Privet! You know..I never even look to see whether they're pro or not. :) Have a great weekend!

agree  Jahongir Sidikov
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Jahongir.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
not for grading


Explanation:
I agree with Kurt's answerr, but I just wanted to say that where this form of address is ultramodern in the Ukraine, it seems quaintly old-fashioned in English.
In 19th-century England, and to some extent probably still today, the servants of a wealth family would address the heads of the family as Sir of Madam, but the children as "Miss Jennifer", "Mr. Peter" (or more likely "Master Peter" if he was young).
In Jane Austen's novels, she observes the custom current in those days whereby the eldest daughter of a family was Miss + surname but the younger ones Miss + forename + surname. So in "Pride and Prejudice", "Miss Bennet" always means the eldest daughter Jane, the others being "Miss Elizabeth Bennett", "Miss Lydia Bennett" etc.

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Note added at 1 hr (2006-02-24 14:27:57 GMT)
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Sorry, I should have said "in Ukraine", not "in the Ukraine", which is also quaintly old-fashioned now.

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Note added at 1 hr (2006-02-24 14:36:19 GMT)
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Other typos:
For answerr read answer.
for of a wealth family read of a wealthy family
For Sir of Madam, read Sir or Madam
The Bennet family in Pride and Prejudice spells its name with only one "t",
so for Elizabeth and Lydia, read Bennet, not Bennett.
I hope I haven't made any more typos in this note.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:49
Meets criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 483
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you, Mr.Doughty! :-)

Asker: You need not to apologise! The matter is quite clear even with tipos :-)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Andrey Belousov: За работу над ошибками!
50 mins
  -> Спасибо! Заслуженное соглашение.
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