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чмыришь

English translation: Approximate translation: What are you doing, you frigging idiot?

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12:58 Aug 21, 2014
Russian to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Slang
Russian term or phrase: чмыришь
"Чо ты чмо чмыришь недоделанрый?"

I'm lost. Any help appreciated. And no, there's no further context...
Michael Marcoux
United States
Local time: 12:47
English translation:Approximate translation: What are you doing, you frigging idiot?
Explanation:
Any New Yorker would know what, or rather who, a schmo is. That part is easy. Chmyrish, apparently from "chmyrit'" seems like an attempt at using alliteration creatively for a more convincing effect. Technically, there is no such word. Nedodelanniy, literally, is "underdone", i. e. not made properly (cf. a more commonly used Russian taunt: Have you been made with a finger?) Now, that's the intended meaning. Naturally, there's so many ways of saying this in English depending on the context and the overall key of the situation that I am not even going to bother suggesting any. I am sure you know them all yourself.
Selected response from:

The Misha
Local time: 12:47
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3Approximate translation: What are you doing, you frigging idiot?The Misha
3 +2behave like an asshole
Andrew Vdovin
1 +3What the hell are you shitting about, you freaking sucker?
AKhram
3см.
Inga Velikanova
4 -1bully
Ekaterina Vashurina
2 -1hayseeding
Alexander Grabowski
Summary of reference entries provided
it is a noun
Maria Sometti

Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): -1
hayseeding


Explanation:
.

Alexander Grabowski
Ukraine
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in UkrainianUkrainian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  The Misha: What does that mean? I tried to google the word and all I am getting is - you got it! - hay seeding techniques. Are you sure this is what you meant?//Except that's not what the word means in English, if this is even a word.
8 mins
  -> This is a figurative for the Russain Лох = Чмырь////thanks for the comment, i give up )
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Approximate translation: What are you doing, you frigging idiot?


Explanation:
Any New Yorker would know what, or rather who, a schmo is. That part is easy. Chmyrish, apparently from "chmyrit'" seems like an attempt at using alliteration creatively for a more convincing effect. Technically, there is no such word. Nedodelanniy, literally, is "underdone", i. e. not made properly (cf. a more commonly used Russian taunt: Have you been made with a finger?) Now, that's the intended meaning. Naturally, there's so many ways of saying this in English depending on the context and the overall key of the situation that I am not even going to bother suggesting any. I am sure you know them all yourself.

The Misha
Local time: 12:47
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  LanaUK
1 hr
  -> Thank you.

agree  Tevah_Trans: As always, right on
2 hrs
  -> Ah, thank you. I am blushing.

neutral  LilianNekipelov: I am not convinced--especially the doing part--it is more like "saying'.
7 hrs

agree  Rachel Douglas
9 hrs
  -> Thanks, Rachel.

disagree  danya: особенно забавно было прочесть, что нет слова "чмырить"
9 hrs
  -> Наверное, для Вас есть. Бог Вам в помощь.

agree  Roman Bouchev: Вместо what я бы ипользовал whatcha (+ sayin'), чтобы отразить разговорный оттенок грубого обращения. В остальном зависит от общего настроения всего текста, характера персонажа и т.д.
3 days 20 hrs
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
см.


Explanation:
what the fuck you shitting this jerk, you piece of shit

если правильно поняла контекст по-русски
очень извиняюсь за грубые слова

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Note added at 12 mins (2014-08-21 13:10:53 GMT)
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или why the fuck you shitting this jerk, you piece of shit

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 mins (2014-08-21 13:24:33 GMT)
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чмо чмыришь = наконец-то дошло! значит чё тупишь, мямлишь фигню и отмазываешься

буду думать

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Note added at 57 mins (2014-08-21 13:56:14 GMT)
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чмо чмыришь - что ты из себя чмо строишь


Inga Velikanova
Russian Federation
Local time: 20:47
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  The Misha: For one thing, this is not how you say it in English. For the other, outside any corroborating context I wdn't be so sure this mysterious chmyrit is intended to mean "to beat someone". The sentence structure doesn't seem to support this interpretation.
14 mins

neutral  Maria Sometti: agree with The Misha's comment
1 hr

agree  Tevah_Trans: Agree with The Misha; also, the s-words and the f-words are "unwriteables" in Russian meaning; the word "chmyrit'" is not usually bleeped out.
2 hrs

neutral  LilianNekipelov: It's too strong--that' all.
7 hrs

disagree  Rachel Douglas: Quite apart from the difference in register, what you've written is not even fluent English slang.
9 hrs
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
bully


Explanation:
ЧМЫРИТЬ
ЧМЫРИТЬ 1, -рю, -ришь; несов. , кого.
Бить, ругать, издеваться, унижать.
Возм. от см. чмо
ЧМЫРИТЬ means
beat, scold/abuse verbally, scoof at, humiliate


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Note added at 1 hr (2014-08-21 14:05:21 GMT)
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"Dictionary of Youth Slang" by Nikitina (St.P. Folio-Press, 1998) gives the following definition of "чмо": "ЧМО, пренеб. Морально опустившийся человек. ЧМО - плохой человек..." С.516 So, as a translation bully can also be used depending on the context.

Example sentence(s):
  • Не чмыри его!

    Reference: http://slovar-vocab.com/english-russian-english/slang-russia...
Ekaterina Vashurina
Russian Federation
Local time: 21:47
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  The Misha: You mean schmo is a bully? Really? The dictionary you cite seems fishy, and in any case "to beat" simply doesn't fit here.
20 mins
  -> "chmyrit" has many meanings depending on the context. The main idea of this slang word is to humiliate or abuse physically or verbally.

neutral  Tevah_Trans: sorry for translit; CHMO means "chelovek meshayushii obshestvu" according to my 2nd grade memories
2 hrs
  -> "Dictionary of Youth Slang" by Nikitina (St.P. Folio-Press, 1998) gives the following definition of "чмо": "ЧМО, пренеб. Морально опустившийся человек. ЧМО - плохой человек..." С.516

disagree  LilianNekipelov: No--not in this context--you cannot use the word in this context.
7 hrs
  -> We have only one phrase that can beused with any inmplication and understood as "Why are you bullying me, you bastard?" Sorry for the bad word.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +3
What the hell are you shitting about, you freaking sucker?


Explanation:
-

AKhram
Local time: 20:47
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Inga Velikanova: кстати, да, вполне
4 mins

agree  Elena Tikhomirova: quite so
28 mins

agree  LilianNekipelov: It's slightly too strong. I would change sh..ing to mumbling, perhaps.
5 hrs
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17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
behave like an asshole


Explanation:
Why are you acting like a stupid asshole?

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Note added at 17 hrs (2014-08-22 06:38:22 GMT)
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Or, it could also mean the following:
"Why are you pushing on/bullying this asshole, you stupid idiot?"

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Note added at 17 hrs (2014-08-22 06:40:22 GMT)
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Yet the first version seems more obvious.

Andrew Vdovin
Local time: 00:47
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 5

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  LilianNekipelov: as an option.
2 hrs
  -> Thank you!

agree  Roman Bouchev: Мне кажется, для передачи ломанности синтаксиса (Чо ты, чмо, чмыришь, недоделанный) нужно подобрать такой же строй фразы, например: You stop puttin me down, you dumbass! Для пацанского жаргона литературность неестественна.
3 days 3 hrs
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Reference comments


1 hr peer agreement (net): -1
Reference: it is a noun

Reference information:
I tend to agree with a_grabo and consider it is a noun. In Russian we have чмырь, you can see the meaning here:http://dic.academic.ru/dic.nsf/dic_synonims/196885/чмырь
чмыришь sounds like a diminutive form. The fact that it could be a noun is supported by the adj. недоделанный standing right after the term in question.

Maria Sometti
Italy
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in BelarusianBelarusian

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
neutral  Ekaterina Vashurina: maybe I am wrong but usually the ending -ить and its form -ишь denote a verb, so "чмыришь" is a verb coined from noun "чмырь"
56 mins
  -> totally correct remark, but taking it as a noun, the whole meaning of the phrase is so blurry
neutral  LilianNekipelov: It is a verb--which comes from a noun. Just a coined verb.
5 hrs
disagree  danya: no, it is not a noun
8 hrs
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