https://www.proz.com/kudoz/slovak-to-english/poetry-literature/4346267-odkundes.html

odkundes

English translation: vagabond

07:16 May 5, 2011
Slovak to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Slovak term or phrase: odkundes
nadavka, doslovne clovek, o ktorom nevieme, odkial pochadza. v rozpravke - Vy odkundesi, sak ja vam ukazem!
vierama
Local time: 13:14
English translation:vagabond
Explanation:
That would be my choice. We have word "vagabund" in Slovak as well and means more or less the same as "odkundes".
Selected response from:

Rad Graban
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:14
Grading comment
i thank all of you for your time and ideas.
a tram being vulgar seems not proper for a fairy-tale, an interloper does not sound to me sufficiently pejorative for an invective. so i have chosen a vagabond although i had hoped there would have been an english counterpart rightly for "odkundes" as english is a really rich language. surprisingly, it seems there is no such a counterpart.
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2tramp
Mike Gogulski
5wanderer/vagabond
Maria Chmelarova
3 +1vagabond
Rad Graban
3interloper
Nathaniel2


  

Answers


20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
tramp


Explanation:
Based on what I've read in SSJ and Synonmicky slovnik slovenskeho jazyka, I'd go with "tramp".


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tramp
Mike Gogulski
Slovakia
Local time: 13:14
Works in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Uncle: beat me to it ;) odkundes = pobehaj, skaderuka-skadenoha, preto suhlasim s "tramp".
1 min
  -> Thanks! All I could think of at first were "auslander" and "gringo", but somehow those don't really fit ;)

disagree  Peter Kissik: Ide o nadávku, a "tramp" rozhodne nadávka nie je.
54 mins
  -> Eh, did you even read the linked article? "Like "hobo" and "bum," the word "tramp" is considered vulgar in American English usage, having been subsumed in more polite contexts by words such as "homeless person" or "vagrant.""

agree  Melissa Dedina: tramp may not be a nadavka IN SLOVAK, but it is IN ENGLISH. which is the important issue at present :)
2 hrs

agree  V. Reisova: tramp is considered vulgar in American English usage.
5 hrs
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38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
vagabond


Explanation:
That would be my choice. We have word "vagabund" in Slovak as well and means more or less the same as "odkundes".

Rad Graban
United Kingdom
Local time: 12:14
Native speaker of: Native in SlovakSlovak
Grading comment
i thank all of you for your time and ideas.
a tram being vulgar seems not proper for a fairy-tale, an interloper does not sound to me sufficiently pejorative for an invective. so i have chosen a vagabond although i had hoped there would have been an english counterpart rightly for "odkundes" as english is a really rich language. surprisingly, it seems there is no such a counterpart.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Peter Kissik: I find it a lot better than "tramp".
35 mins
  -> Thank you.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
interloper


Explanation:
Another term for odkundes is "priselec" and I think interloper fits that, but I suppose the use of interloper would depend on the degree of "literaryness" you're looking for in your translation


    Reference: http://oxforddictionaries.com/view/entry/m_en_gb0416720#m_en...
Nathaniel2
Local time: 13:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
wanderer/vagabond


Explanation:
odkundes, syn.- prišeles, dobrodruh, vagabund, privandrovalec...človek o ktorom sa nič nevie...
vagabun (z lat.) hist.- remeselník, ktorý nebol členom cechu; neskor .... tulák vandrovník, lump, pobehaj
A vagabond is etymologically a 'wanderer'.
The word comes via Old French vagabond from Latin vagabundas, which was derived from vagari-wander...And vagari in turn was based on vagus, wandering , undecided....
....z toho aj nazov nasej rieky Váh-Wag, bludiaca rieka... podla Rimanov a na ich mapach....

Maria Chmelarova
Local time: 07:14
Native speaker of: Slovak
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