KudoZ home » Slovak to English » Music

Muzikantske rozmarnosti

English translation: Musician's humorousness

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Slovak term or phrase:Muzikantske rozmarnosti
English translation:Musician's humorousness
Entered by: Maria Chmelarova
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

20:28 Feb 15, 2007
Slovak to English translations [PRO]
Music / Lyric translation
Slovak term or phrase: Muzikantske rozmarnosti
Again, this is a very short audio example for translation. The lyrics are consistently the same throughout the song and it's more about the variations on the melody, but I still want to know what this means and I can't begin to spell it...Please listen to the clip at:

http://palapala9.tripod.com/

This method worked well on the last question.
AbraCol
Local time: 21:12
Musician's humourness
Explanation:
if it is not a name of song ....

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2007-02-16 05:06:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

perhaps this is better - humorous- full of humor; humorously, humorousness

rozmarný - whimsical
Selected response from:

Maria Chmelarova
Local time: 00:12
Grading comment
Well, it's still a caprice, according to Hradistan, the source of the original lyrics and music which indicate brevity. I understand it to be a concise, whimsical melody. Also a Czech speaker pointed out "Jocundities" as being indicated in the title--this quality found in the rhythm of folk games in motion done by young pages. It seems that such adjectives as "light-hearted", "whimsical", and "caprice" all seem to fit in a way.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +1Musicians' Caprices
Pro Lingua
5Musicians' light-heartness
Rad Graban
4Musician's humournessMaria Chmelarova


  

Answers


39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Musicians' Caprices


Explanation:
...


    Reference: http://www.dealtime.co.uk/xPF-_2005475726
    Reference: http://www.musicabona.com/czechfolklore/cd/2.html.de
Pro Lingua
Local time: 06:12
Native speaker of: Slovak
Notes to answerer
Asker: Okay, it really does agree with the original Hradistan title. It's a short instrumental piece. Perhaps a wedding march as the lyrics are over and over: "Pacholata jdou" Someone on the Slovak list suggested it had to do with the "pages going" What does it mean to you? Young pages prominading at a wedding?


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lucia [Lulu] Lay
37 mins
  -> Dakujem
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

50 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Musician's humourness


Explanation:
if it is not a name of song ....

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2007-02-16 05:06:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

perhaps this is better - humorous- full of humor; humorously, humorousness

rozmarný - whimsical

Maria Chmelarova
Local time: 00:12
Native speaker of: Slovak
PRO pts in category: 6
Grading comment
Well, it's still a caprice, according to Hradistan, the source of the original lyrics and music which indicate brevity. I understand it to be a concise, whimsical melody. Also a Czech speaker pointed out "Jocundities" as being indicated in the title--this quality found in the rhythm of folk games in motion done by young pages. It seems that such adjectives as "light-hearted", "whimsical", and "caprice" all seem to fit in a way.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Humourness is not a word in English.

Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Musicians' light-heartness


Explanation:
I just have to disagree with "caprice" suggestions. The connotation in Slovak is not the same, and definitely not in this context.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2007-02-16 04:18:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Apart from that, you need to take into consideration that these are all old folk songs. I don't think that using "caprises" and/or humourness would work. IMHO

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 hrs (2007-02-16 04:45:18 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Never realised, it was in the title. In that case you should use Italian/international "Capriccio".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs (2007-02-16 06:45:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It is. You get lots of answers from dictionaries, but having English as the language of habitual use for the past twelve years, I can suss out subttle differences in cohesion other people probably can't.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs (2007-02-16 06:58:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Cohesion v Connotation (my apologies)

Rad Graban
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:12
Native speaker of: Native in SlovakSlovak
PRO pts in category: 4
Notes to answerer
Asker: I just looked up the Hradistan translation (see Pro Lingua's links) and they actually use the words "Musicians' Caprice" even though I like the feeling of your term "light heartedness". A "caprice, to my understanding, it an short instrumental piece and this one is a simple melody with many variations. So I understand why they title it this way now.

Asker: "Light-heartedness" is "rozmarnosti" in Slovak?


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Maria Chmelarova: tiez si myslim ze "caprice "nie je spravny vyraz, hoci je pouzity v nazve piesne.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Maria. I think, it's very 'technical'. My earlier suggestion "capriccio", is probably even more technical, but at least proper, internationaly recognised, musical term
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search