el hombre se ha subido a la cornisa del tiempo

English translation: man has climbed to the precipice of time

09:41 Oct 24, 2019
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Marketing - Advertising / Public Relations
Spanish term or phrase: el hombre se ha subido a la cornisa del tiempo
Es un texto sobre la longevidad de las empresas centenarias. Un texto de marketing.

Las empresas centenarias son tesoros nacionales, capaces de sobrevivir a Las turbulencias económicas, la competencia globalizada y la disrupción tecnológica. Desde la alborada de nuestra existencia, ***el hombre se ha subido a la cornisa del tiempo*** y mirado el futuro. La longevidad es uno de los grandes anhelos del ser humano pero también de las empresas.

Also: Danone, Agbar, Codorníu, Iberdrola, J. García Carrión, CaixaBank (antes, La Caixa), Osborne, Metrovacesa o Iberia, entre otras, han enfrentado a ese mastín herido que es el tiempo y le han derrotado. Cada una tiene su propia estrategia y su propio relato. Aunque hay vértices comunes ***en esa cornisa*** sobre las horas. “Trabajo, esfuerzo y máxima dedicación”, resume Silvia Mazzoli, profesora de emprendimiento de la escuela de negocios EOI. “Porque sin duda la pasión ayuda a hacer más llevadero emplear tanta energía para que la compañía alcance el éxito”.

Estoy pensando en: Since the dawn of our existence, ***man has climbed up the ledge of time*** and looked to the future.
Pero me suena un poco artificial.
Charlotte Bower
Spain
Local time: 04:33
English translation:man has climbed to the precipice of time
Explanation:
I think the sense of "la cornisa" here is a point (ledge/precipice) that man arrives at / climbs up to, rather than climbs along. The visual it conjects is someone standing on the edge/ledge of time (to which he has climbed), looking/gazing out towards an abyss/spaciousness of future. It seems the visual could be lost if the TT preposition emphasizes the climbing (which might be "por la cornisa") rather than the act of arriving ("a la cornisa"). "Cornisa," by any definition, is a narrow outcropping... something one might be precariously perched on but likely not climbing along. Thoughts?
Selected response from:

Stephanie Ament
United States
Local time: 21:33
Grading comment
Thank you Stephanie.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +1climbed up the mountain of time
Sara Fairen
4man has climbed to the precipice of time
Stephanie Ament
4man has climbed up the edge of time
Cecilia Gowar
2Man has ascended the bank of Time and gazed into the future
ormiston
2Man climbed onto the ledge (of time) and gazed at the future
Marian Vieyra


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
climbed up the mountain of time


Explanation:
I was thinking that something like "humanity has climbed up the mountain of time to look..." could be a more appropriate metaphor, but it turns out somebody else used it first :-)


https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Q2G10lVkdOcC&pg=PT45&lpg...

We climb up the mountain of time, bearing with us the instruments of our own death. At first the goal is far distant. We do not think of it; the present is enough: the ...


Sara Fairen
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:33
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard: Good idea, and I think this works better than the other suggestions. I would omit "up".
2 hrs
  -> Thanks! :-)
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33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
Man climbed onto the ledge (of time) and gazed at the future


Explanation:
A real mish-mash of metaphors, what with mastiffs and ledges. Your own suggestion is good. Although somewhat Nietzschean, stared into the abyss also came to mind.

Marian Vieyra
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:33
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 32
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
Man has ascended the bank of Time and gazed into the future


Explanation:
With a nod to Shakespeare's "bank and shoal of Time"!

ormiston
Local time: 04:33
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
man has climbed up the edge of time


Explanation:
Since the dawn of existence, man has climbed up the edge of time and looked into the future.

Your version with a few amendments. I believe ¨edge¨sounds and fits better than ¨ledge¨in English. And the phrase is also familiar.
https://www.brainpickings.org/2012/09/17/the-meaning-of-life...

The quest to understand the meaning of life has haunted humanity since the dawn of existence.
Warrior on the Edge of Time
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warrior_on_the_Edge_of_Time


Cecilia Gowar
United Kingdom
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 28
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1 day 4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
man has climbed to the precipice of time


Explanation:
I think the sense of "la cornisa" here is a point (ledge/precipice) that man arrives at / climbs up to, rather than climbs along. The visual it conjects is someone standing on the edge/ledge of time (to which he has climbed), looking/gazing out towards an abyss/spaciousness of future. It seems the visual could be lost if the TT preposition emphasizes the climbing (which might be "por la cornisa") rather than the act of arriving ("a la cornisa"). "Cornisa," by any definition, is a narrow outcropping... something one might be precariously perched on but likely not climbing along. Thoughts?


    Reference: http://dle.rae.es/?id=AuZ4ir1
Stephanie Ament
United States
Local time: 21:33
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you Stephanie.
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