falda de sombrero

English translation: the brim of a hat

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:falda de sombrero
English translation:the brim of a hat
Entered by: Charles Davis

12:06 Aug 2, 2017
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Archaeology / Text from the Canary Isla
Spanish term or phrase: falda de sombrero
Marín de Cubas, describe algunos restos de los antiguos canarios que observa en el siglo XVII, para zonas próximas al área de influencia del Paisaje Cultural propuesto:
“...las cuebas son unas mui grandes y largas comunicadas por dentro, y puertas o ventanajes para lumbreras, algunas de pequeñas entrada, y dentro largos huecos llenos de huezos de difuntos, otras se ven en los riscos peinados, que tienen mirlados, y huezos, y en partes tan altas que solo aves pueden entrar dentro, a algunas entran colgando con sogas; ai algunas cosas que parece, que el diablo las hacía, u que ellos apostaban con el; en riscos de peña viva ai agujeros mui grandes, y metdos en ellos tan grandes y fuertes maderos como vigas de lagar, oi se ve algo de esto en el barranco de Azuage sobre altísimos riscos, maderos encajados y atravesados otros, y esto devajo de unos peñascos que coronan el risco por lo alto a modo de ****falda de sombrero con que no pudieron colgarlos por arriva, ni por que casusa se haría tal obra.”****

I'm having trouble understanding the last sentence of this paragraph between **** ****. I would appreciate any help/ suggestions. TIA
Lorna O'Donoghue
Local time: 02:53
the brim of a hat
Explanation:
Or a hat brim, if you prefer. "Falda" was used in the past as an alternative to "ala"; in fact it's still among the definitions of "falda" in the DLE:

"10. f. Ala del sombrero."
http://dle.rae.es/?id=HWcrEr8

It's describing an overhanging rocky projection that prevented these pieces of wood being lowered from above. So it's difficult to understand how they got them there.

The last part of the sentence "ni por que casusa se haría tal obra", is obscure. I presume "casusa" must be a typo for "causa", but there still seems to be something missing. I think we have to read it as "ni (está claro/es posible comprender) por qué causa se haría tal obra". So it means, more or less, "nor is it clear why they did it".
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 03:53
Grading comment
Thank you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +5the brim of a hat
Charles Davis


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
the brim of a hat


Explanation:
Or a hat brim, if you prefer. "Falda" was used in the past as an alternative to "ala"; in fact it's still among the definitions of "falda" in the DLE:

"10. f. Ala del sombrero."
http://dle.rae.es/?id=HWcrEr8

It's describing an overhanging rocky projection that prevented these pieces of wood being lowered from above. So it's difficult to understand how they got them there.

The last part of the sentence "ni por que casusa se haría tal obra", is obscure. I presume "casusa" must be a typo for "causa", but there still seems to be something missing. I think we have to read it as "ni (está claro/es posible comprender) por qué causa se haría tal obra". So it means, more or less, "nor is it clear why they did it".

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 03:53
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 116
Grading comment
Thank you.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Patricia Fierro, M. Sc.
20 mins
  -> Thanks, Patricia :)

agree  Marie Wilson
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Marie :)

agree  neilmac: Ahem... hats off to Charles yet again!
2 hrs
  -> (Groan). Cheers, Neil :-) Brimming with wit as usual!

agree  Rachel Fell: It sounded as though it must be that:-)
8 hrs
  -> Yup. Thanks, Rachel :)

agree  Robert Carter: Fairly sure that "falda" is still common usage in relation to hats here in Mexico; I've never heard "ala" used in that context.
11 hrs
  -> That's very interesting. It's not used in Spain nowadays, but this is, after all, early Canarian Spanish, which has many similarities to American Spanish.
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