región suberosa, región pilífera, región lisa y cofia

English translation: zone of maturation/zone of cell elongation/zone of cell division/root cap

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:región suberosa/región pilifera/región lisa/cofía
English translation:zone of maturation/zone of cell elongation/zone of cell division/root cap
Entered by: Taña Dalglish

15:06 Sep 26, 2018
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Science - Botany / part of the root of flowering plants
Spanish term or phrase: región suberosa, región pilífera, región lisa y cofia
I have checked glossaries and picture dictionaries and can only come up with the root cap, but beyond that, roots seem to be divided differently in English. I know these go from the base of the root to the upper part. So far I have come up with: the suberose region, the region of maturation, the region of elongation and the root cap.

Anyone know if these are correct? Thanks!
maryblack
United States
Local time: 02:07
cofia -- root cap / región pilífera - absorption zone/feeder root zone/root hair zone/piliferous lay
Explanation:
As per references.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 52 mins (2018-09-26 15:58:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

piliferous layer.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2018-09-26 16:20:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Errata. Okay Mary, I think I have it now: "cofia" is the root cap. The others: zone of active cell division, zone of cell elongation, and zone of maturation

https://www.cliffsnotes.com/study-guides/biology/plant-biolo...
As cells are added to the tip by repeated cell divisions, a young root elongates and leaves behind cells that differentiate and become the primary roots of the plant. Four areas of the young root traditionally are recognized, but except for the terminal area, are not distinctly separate. Their descriptive names are only partially correct in describing the activities taking place in each area. These regions, starting at the tip and moving upwards towards the stem, are the ****root cap, zone of active cell division, zone of cell elongation, and zone of maturation.***

The first two are compacted in the first centimeter or less of the axis with the latter two no more than 4–5 centimeters from the tip. Only the root cap and the cell division regions actually move through the soil. After cells start to elongate and mature, no further extension takes place, and the root is stationary for the rest of its life.

Root cap
The root cap is a cup-shaped, loosely cemented mass of parenchyma cells that covers the tip of the root. As cells are lost among the soil particles, new ones are added from the meristem behind the cap. The cap is a unique feature of roots; the tip of the stem has no such structure. From its shape, structure, and location, its primary function seems clear: It protects the cells under it from abrasion and assists the root in penetrating the soil. Phenomenal numbers of cap cells are produced to replace those worn off and lost as root tips push through the soil.

The movement is assisted by a slimy substance, mucigel, which is produced by cells of the root cap and epidermis. The mucigel

Lubricates the roots.

Contains materials that are inhibitory to roots of other species.

Influences ion uptake.

Attracts beneficial soil microorganisms.

Glues soil particles to the roots thereby improving the soil-plant contact and facilitating water movement from the soil into the plant.

Protects the root cells from drying out.

Root cap cells sense light in some as yet unexplained way and direct root growth away from light. The root cap also senses gravity to which roots respond by growing downward, bringing them into contact with the soil, the reservoir of nutrients and water used by plants. The root cap also responds to pressures exerted by the soil particles.

Zone of cell division
An apical meristem lies under and behind the root cap and, like the stem apical meristem, it produces the cells that give rise to the primary body of the plant. Unlike the stem meristem, it is not at the very tip of the root; it lies behind the root cap. Between the area of active division and the cap is an area where cells divide more slowly, the quiescent center. Most cell divisions occur along the edges of this center and give rise to columns of cells arranged parallel to the root axis. The parenchyma cells of the meristem are small, cuboidal, with dense protoplasts devoid of vacuoles and with relatively large nuclei.

The apical meristem of the root organizes to form the three primary meristems:protoderm, which gives rise to the epidermis; procambium, which produces xylem and phloem; and the ground meri-stem, which produces the cortex. Pith, present in most stems and produced from the ground meristem, is absent in most dicot (eudicot) roots, but is found in many monocot roots.

Zone of cell elongation
The cells in this zone stretch and lengthen as small vacuoles within the cytoplasm coalesce and fill with water. One or two large vacuoles occupy almost all of the cell volume in fully elongated cells. Cellular expansion in this zone is responsible for pushing the root cap and apical tip forward through the soil.

Zone of maturation
The elongating cells complete their differentiation into the tissues of the primary body in this zone. It is easily recognized because of the numerous root hairs that extend into the soil as outgrowths of single epidermal cells. They greatly increase the absorptive surface of roots during the growth period when large amounts of water and nutrients are needed. An individual root hair lives for only a day or two, but new ones form constantly nearer the tip as old ones die in the upper part of the zone.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2018-09-26 18:39:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

https://books.google.com.jm/books?id=0jGB8UHyRG0C&pg=PA165&l...
Root
External Structure
A dicotyledonous plant has a tap root system. The diagram below (shown on opening link) shows the external features of the root tip of a dicotyledonous plant. The root can be categorised into three sections — the region of cell division, elongation and maturation. The region of cell division consists of young cells that are actively dividing to form new cells. At the region of elongation (E), the cells elongate. thereby increasing the length of the root. When the root lengthens, it will push against the soil particle. To protect the root tip from injury during this process, the root tip is covered by the root cap. Behind the zone of elongation is the zone of maturation (M). There is maximum absorption of water and mineral salts in the zone.
Selected response from:

Taña Dalglish
Jamaica
Local time: 02:07
Grading comment
Thank you so much, Taña! You're a livesaver! I appreciate all your digging!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
2 +2cofia -- root cap / región pilífera - absorption zone/feeder root zone/root hair zone/piliferous lay
Taña Dalglish
Summary of reference entries provided
Refs. only
Taña Dalglish

Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
cofia -- root cap / región pilífera - absorption zone/feeder root zone/root hair zone/piliferous lay


Explanation:
As per references.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 52 mins (2018-09-26 15:58:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

piliferous layer.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2018-09-26 16:20:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Errata. Okay Mary, I think I have it now: "cofia" is the root cap. The others: zone of active cell division, zone of cell elongation, and zone of maturation

https://www.cliffsnotes.com/study-guides/biology/plant-biolo...
As cells are added to the tip by repeated cell divisions, a young root elongates and leaves behind cells that differentiate and become the primary roots of the plant. Four areas of the young root traditionally are recognized, but except for the terminal area, are not distinctly separate. Their descriptive names are only partially correct in describing the activities taking place in each area. These regions, starting at the tip and moving upwards towards the stem, are the ****root cap, zone of active cell division, zone of cell elongation, and zone of maturation.***

The first two are compacted in the first centimeter or less of the axis with the latter two no more than 4–5 centimeters from the tip. Only the root cap and the cell division regions actually move through the soil. After cells start to elongate and mature, no further extension takes place, and the root is stationary for the rest of its life.

Root cap
The root cap is a cup-shaped, loosely cemented mass of parenchyma cells that covers the tip of the root. As cells are lost among the soil particles, new ones are added from the meristem behind the cap. The cap is a unique feature of roots; the tip of the stem has no such structure. From its shape, structure, and location, its primary function seems clear: It protects the cells under it from abrasion and assists the root in penetrating the soil. Phenomenal numbers of cap cells are produced to replace those worn off and lost as root tips push through the soil.

The movement is assisted by a slimy substance, mucigel, which is produced by cells of the root cap and epidermis. The mucigel

Lubricates the roots.

Contains materials that are inhibitory to roots of other species.

Influences ion uptake.

Attracts beneficial soil microorganisms.

Glues soil particles to the roots thereby improving the soil-plant contact and facilitating water movement from the soil into the plant.

Protects the root cells from drying out.

Root cap cells sense light in some as yet unexplained way and direct root growth away from light. The root cap also senses gravity to which roots respond by growing downward, bringing them into contact with the soil, the reservoir of nutrients and water used by plants. The root cap also responds to pressures exerted by the soil particles.

Zone of cell division
An apical meristem lies under and behind the root cap and, like the stem apical meristem, it produces the cells that give rise to the primary body of the plant. Unlike the stem meristem, it is not at the very tip of the root; it lies behind the root cap. Between the area of active division and the cap is an area where cells divide more slowly, the quiescent center. Most cell divisions occur along the edges of this center and give rise to columns of cells arranged parallel to the root axis. The parenchyma cells of the meristem are small, cuboidal, with dense protoplasts devoid of vacuoles and with relatively large nuclei.

The apical meristem of the root organizes to form the three primary meristems:protoderm, which gives rise to the epidermis; procambium, which produces xylem and phloem; and the ground meri-stem, which produces the cortex. Pith, present in most stems and produced from the ground meristem, is absent in most dicot (eudicot) roots, but is found in many monocot roots.

Zone of cell elongation
The cells in this zone stretch and lengthen as small vacuoles within the cytoplasm coalesce and fill with water. One or two large vacuoles occupy almost all of the cell volume in fully elongated cells. Cellular expansion in this zone is responsible for pushing the root cap and apical tip forward through the soil.

Zone of maturation
The elongating cells complete their differentiation into the tissues of the primary body in this zone. It is easily recognized because of the numerous root hairs that extend into the soil as outgrowths of single epidermal cells. They greatly increase the absorptive surface of roots during the growth period when large amounts of water and nutrients are needed. An individual root hair lives for only a day or two, but new ones form constantly nearer the tip as old ones die in the upper part of the zone.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2018-09-26 18:39:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

https://books.google.com.jm/books?id=0jGB8UHyRG0C&pg=PA165&l...
Root
External Structure
A dicotyledonous plant has a tap root system. The diagram below (shown on opening link) shows the external features of the root tip of a dicotyledonous plant. The root can be categorised into three sections — the region of cell division, elongation and maturation. The region of cell division consists of young cells that are actively dividing to form new cells. At the region of elongation (E), the cells elongate. thereby increasing the length of the root. When the root lengthens, it will push against the soil particle. To protect the root tip from injury during this process, the root tip is covered by the root cap. Behind the zone of elongation is the zone of maturation (M). There is maximum absorption of water and mineral salts in the zone.


Taña Dalglish
Jamaica
Local time: 02:07
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 31
Grading comment
Thank you so much, Taña! You're a livesaver! I appreciate all your digging!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard: I didn't remove the question, because you'd already posted a reference and I didn't want it to go to waste!
1 hr
  -> Thank you. I knew someone may decide to do so, so posted something definitively (for once -sarcasm!), although it is not the ideal situation - going to be a rather long glossary entry!

agree  Charles Davis: I haven't removed the question, partly for the same reason as Phil, and partly because I don't know how to :-)
22 hrs
  -> Thank you Charles. I know I have bent the rules this time by facilitating 4 answers (which I rarely ever do!). Nor do I, and leads to ask, who then has this privilege & on what basis? Philg, you want to answer this??
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Reference comments


22 mins peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: Refs. only

Reference information:
@ Mary. You have asked what should be four separate entries. Be aware that a moderator may remove your question, and you will need to repost separate entries.
But I will deal with the one I found first which is "cofia". I also found "root cap".

https://es.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/cofia
Botany
Cubierta membranosa que, en forma de dedal, protege la punta de la raíz de una planta.
el crecimiento se debe a un meristemo situado al final de la raíz, que está protegido por un conjunto de células que se denomina cofia o caliptra

https://www.wordmeaning.org/spanish/cofia.htm
cofia 2
In Botany is the tip or end of the root. Conical tissue that protects the end of the root.


http://www.btb.termiumplus.gc.ca/tpv2alpha/alpha-eng.html?la...
English
Subject field(s)
Plant Biology
root cap
CORRECT
rootcap
CORRECT
pileorhiza
CORRECT
DEF
The outer cell layer at the root tip, functioning in protection and lubrication.

CONT
The root cap is distinct from the root proper. The root apical meristem is located at the apex of the root proper but is buried under the root cap.


Spanish
Campo(s) temático(s)
Biología vegetal
cofia
CORRECT, FEM
DEF
Apice que protege el cono vegetativo de las raíces.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 50 mins (2018-09-26 15:56:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------



@ Mary here is more. However, I fear it may be removed as you have 4 distinct questions.

En la raíz podemos distinguir: la región suberosa, la región pilífera, la región lisa y la cofia.

En la región suberosa se producen las ramificaciones laterales de la raíz.

La región pilífera es la que se encarga de la absorción del agua y las sales minerales. Para
facilitar la entrada de estas sustancias, las células más externas de esta región presentan
unas prolongaciones llamadas pelos absorbentes.

El crecimiento en longitud se produce en la región lisa.

La cofia se encarga de perforar la tierra para avanzar. Es la parte más dura.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_plant_morphology
Suberose – having a corky texture.

============================================
absorption zone/feeder root zone/root hair zone/piliferous layer

http://www.btb.termiumplus.gc.ca/tpv2alpha/alpha-eng.html?la...
English
Subject field(s)
Botany
Horticulture
absorption zone
CORRECT
feeder root zone
CORRECT
root hair zone
piliferous layer
hair zone

Spanish
Campo(s) temático(s)
Botánica
Horticultura
zona pilífera
CORRECT, FEM
DEF
Parte de la raíz que lleva pelos absorbentes.


https://termbank.com/en/spanish-english/piliferous
Category English Spanish
1 Botanic piliferous pilífero [adj]
2 Botany piliferous pilífera [adj/f]

Taña Dalglish
Jamaica
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 31

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  TomWalker
1 hr
  -> Thank you very much Tom. I did find a link with simpler language "root cap, zone of active cell division, zone of cell elongation, and zone of maturation" (answer above).
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search