doctor (titulo en una carta)

English translation: Dear Sir (unless we're sure the adressee has a Ph.D.)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:doctor (titulo en una carta)
English translation:Dear Sir (unless we're sure the adressee has a Ph.D.)
Entered by: María Teresa Taylor Oliver

20:58 Dec 13, 2003
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Bus/Financial
Spanish term or phrase: doctor (titulo en una carta)
Es una carta originada en Colombia, y en el inicio pone:

"**Doctor**
Fulano de Tal
Presidente
Banco de Tal
Colombia

Apreciado **doctor**:"

Mi pregunta es: ¿en estos casos, cómo se pone en inglés? ¿olvido lo de "doctor" y pongo simplemente "sir"?

Gracias,
~*MT*~
María Teresa Taylor Oliver
Panama
Local time: 04:33
Dear Sir
Explanation:
Unless the man has a PhD. or is some other type of medical doctor, dentist, etc., that's all you can do.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 mins (2003-12-13 21:18:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

No, it\'s not necessary to keep the title in English and it\'s not correct unless you\'re 100% sure... Doctor is generally used in Spanish as a sign of respect, whether or not someone as a PhD.
Selected response from:

Marian Greenfield
Local time: 04:33
Grading comment
Thank you, Marian, and Elena, too. I wasn't sure, since Elena is quite right also, but the comment about the "Dr." being dropped outside University circles did it for me. And though maybe the person does have a Ph.D., and it would be quite correct to leave the title in the letter, Marian made a good point of it being used as a sign of respect (I know it's very common in Colombia, where my document originated), and so I cannot be 100% sure. Anyway, since it's not mentioned later in the document, I decided to leave it out altogether.

Such a long explanation for such a little word :)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +9Dear Dr. XX,
Elena Sgarbo (X)
5 +2Dear Sir
Marian Greenfield
5doctor
Kathy Figueroa


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
doctor


Explanation:
Dr. Fulano de Tal
President...
Dear Dr. Fulano de Tal

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Note added at 2003-12-13 21:06:01 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I would keep it. He earned it.

Kathy Figueroa
United States
Local time: 01:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +9
Dear Dr. XX,


Explanation:
Así es el saludo luego del encabezado de la carta aquí en USA, incluyendo el nombre nuevamente después del t´tiulo (Dr, Mr, Ms).

(Las "business letters" a mí me llegan como "Dear Dr. Sgarbossa").

Suerte María Teresa
Elena

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-13 21:35:44 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

María Teresa,

In the several U.S. Universities where I\'ve worked, our PhD\'s have always been addressed as \"Doctor\" in letters, memos, and formal meetings.

HTH

Elena Sgarbo (X)
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 3539

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Graham
49 mins
  -> Thanks Nikki, saludos :-)

agree  Maria Herrera
2 hrs
  -> Thanks María

agree  Rantes: If it is a doctor or Phd you call it Doctor
5 hrs
  -> Thanks Rantes

agree  Sp-EnTranslator
7 hrs
  -> Thanks Claudia

agree  Marcela Robaina Boyd
14 hrs
  -> Gracias Marcela

agree  Arcoiris: that clearly is the title the person chooses for himself. We should address people by their choosen method
16 hrs
  -> Thanks Apricitas

agree  María Isabel Estévez (maisa)
21 hrs
  -> Gracias maisa

agree  Mikel Yarza Dietrich
21 hrs
  -> Gracias Mikel

agree  Refugio: But the title Dr. is often dropped outside of universities
2 days 2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Dear Sir


Explanation:
Unless the man has a PhD. or is some other type of medical doctor, dentist, etc., that's all you can do.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 mins (2003-12-13 21:18:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

No, it\'s not necessary to keep the title in English and it\'s not correct unless you\'re 100% sure... Doctor is generally used in Spanish as a sign of respect, whether or not someone as a PhD.

Marian Greenfield
Local time: 04:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 14613
Grading comment
Thank you, Marian, and Elena, too. I wasn't sure, since Elena is quite right also, but the comment about the "Dr." being dropped outside University circles did it for me. And though maybe the person does have a Ph.D., and it would be quite correct to leave the title in the letter, Marian made a good point of it being used as a sign of respect (I know it's very common in Colombia, where my document originated), and so I cannot be 100% sure. Anyway, since it's not mentioned later in the document, I decided to leave it out altogether.

Such a long explanation for such a little word :)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  sileugenia: Exacto, Marian.
2 hrs

agree  Adriana Torres
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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